Join TerraCorps

Apply to be a TerraCorps Service Member for the 2018-2019 program year! As a member, you can  serve with any of our 20+ partner sites in one of four positions: Land Stewardship Coordinator (LSC), Regional Collaboration Coordinator (RCC), Community Engagement Coordinator (CEC), and Youth Education Coordinator (YEC).  For more information about each coordinator position visit our program page.   Check out the map below to see what partner organizations are hosting members next year! For more details about each position, scroll past the map to read individual position announcements. Instructions on how to apply can be found at the bottom of the page. 

Map of Open TerraCorps Service Positions

Backyard Growers

Gloucester, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.

New Entry Sustainable Farming Project

Lowell, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Berkshire Natural Resource Council

Pittsfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.

Buzzards Bay Coalition & Wareham Land Trust

New Bedford, MA
Hosting:
2 Land Stewardship Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

East Quabbin Land Trust

Hardwick, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

Groundwork Somerville

Somerville, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education Coord.

Growing Places

Leominster, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.

Hilltown Land Trust

Ashfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardhsip Coord.

Just Roots

Greenfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Kestrel Land Trust

Amherst, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust

Athol, MA
Hosting:
2 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

Mystic River Watershed Association

Arlington, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

North County Land Trust

Leominster, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

South Eastern MA Pine Barrens Alliance

Plymouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.

Sudbury Valley Trustees

Sudbury, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Wildlands Trust

Plymouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Scroll over the map to see what partner organizations are hosting TerraCorps members this year! Below the map are full position descriptions for each position. 

Open TerraCorps Service Positions

Backyard Growers

Backyard Growers is working to reshape Gloucester’s relationship with food. We provide resources and training to help people re-imagine how land in backyards, housing communities, schools, and throughout the community can be used to establish vegetable gardens and grow food. Since 2010 Backyard Growers has built over 150 raised bed gardens, serving hundreds of Gloucester residents. We serve 100% of public school students from preschool to 6th grade, providing true seed-to-fork experiences for Gloucester kids. In the end, we create life-long gardeners inspired by the power of growing one’s own food.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Backyard Growers has proposed the following potential project for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  • Expand Senior Programming: In 2019, one of our oldest community garden sites is being renovated to include a new 8 bed community garden with additional, table-top gardens for increased accessibility. With a lapse in a garden season during the construction year, the 2019 CEC will focus on building connections, training new gardeners, and establishing new programs at the expanded garden site.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • associate degree; experience may be substituted for education
  • a strong interest in working with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • experience in community organizing and outreach
  • experience working with groups of people of diverse ages and backgrounds
  • commitment to and experience in community work, education, and food justice
  • excellent organization, time management, work ethic, leadership, communication and writing skills
  • an aptitude for multitasking projects at various states of completion
  • eager to learn and able to solve problems independently and as part of a team
  • experience or interest in organic gardening and/or farming
  • an aptitude for physically demanding, fast-paced work (the ability to safely lift and carry 50 pounds repeatedly)
  • be eager to work hard and get dirty in all kinds of weather (cold, heat, rain, snow, wind)
  • must have access to your own vehicle, and be willing and able to drive a large work van.
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental education, environmental and social justice, environmental policy and civic advocacy, or other social science related fields.
  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government, or civic organizations
  • marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • experience with service learning programs

 

For questions about Backyard Growers’ service positions, contact Anna Swanson at anna@backyardgrowers.org

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles.

YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Backyard Growers has proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education Coordinator:

  • Expand School Break Programs:  In 2019, we aim to expand our current February and April break programs to include at least two collaborations with other community partners to create programs that highlight the strengths of both of our organizations. For example, a youth yoga class at a local yoga studio, followed by a green smoothie demo with Backyard Growers.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • Associate degree; experience may be substituted for education
  • Experience teaching or leading groups in the outdoors, preferably youth
  • Experience with hands-on conservation and stewardship projects
  • Strong presentation skills
  • Strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • Familiarity with Microsoft Office programs
  • Experience creating lesson plans, managing a classroom, and facilitating workshops
  • Enjoys working with children and community members in various settings
  • Commitment to and experience in community work, education, and food justice
  • Excellent organization, time management, work ethic, leadership, communication and writing skills
  • An aptitude for multitasking projects at various states of completion
  • Eager to learn and able to solve problems independently and as part of a team
  • Experience or interest in organic gardening and/or farming
  • An aptitude for physically demanding, fast-paced work (the ability to safely lift and carry 50 pounds repeatedly)
  • Be eager to work hard and get dirty in all kinds of weather (cold, heat, rain, snow, wind)
  • Must have access to your own vehicle, and be willing and able to drive a large work van.

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental education, environmental and social justice, environmental policy and civic advocacy, or other social science related fields.
  • experience training and managing volunteers

 

For questions about Backyard Growers’ service positions, contact Anna Swanson at anna@backyardgrowers.org

Berkshire Natural Resources Council

Berkshire Natural Resources Council works “to protect and preserve the natural beauty and ecological integrity of the Berkshires for public benefit and enjoyment.” BNRC has been protecting land in Berkshire County for 50 years. BNRC recently launched is High Road initiative which envisions a county-wide trail network connecting towns to nature and ecology for the benefit of residents and visitors. This initiative is intended to realize Berkshires for the benefit of wildlife and ecology at local and regional scales.

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs.

RCCs may assist their service site and partner organizations with collaborative projects and activities such as: developing Municipal Open Space and Recreation Plans; completing farmland and food systems mapping and inventories; securing and protecting land for use as community farms, forests, and parks; planning recreational greenways; developing farm-to-institution and buy local food campaigns; building farmer-to-farmland matching systems; and organizing trainings and outreach for open space planning, farmland protection, land access and affordability options. By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Berkshire Natural Resources Council has proposed the following potential project for their Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

  • Analyzing and developing strategies for particular High Road connectivity projects as directed by BNRC, with partner agencies as appropriate. The specific project can be catered toward the experience and strengths of the TerraCorps member but will likely include intensive mapping analyses and project development, including collaborations with local land trusts, neighbors to conservation land, trail users, and/or municipal and state agencies.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with municipalities on sustainable land use projects
  • comfortable speaking to groups
  • strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs
  • basic understanding of computer mapping skills; GIS preferred

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to landscape architecture, urban or regional planning, real estate law, food systems planning, natural resource planning, or other related fields.
  • full competency in computer mapping skills; GIS preferred
  • experience coordinating events and/or meetings
  • experience developing public information materials
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government and/or civic organizations
  • experience in land conservation, land use planning, and/or real estate law

For questions about Berkshire Natural Resources Council’s service positions, contact Mariah Auman at mauman@bnrc.org or 413-499-0596.

Buzzards Bay Coalition & Wareham Land Trust

Buzzards Bay Coalition (BBC) is dedicated to the restoration, protection, and sustainable use and enjoyment of Buzzards Bay and its watershed. The Coalition works to improve the health of the Bay ecosystem for all through education, conservation, research, and advocacy. The Watershed Protection Department within BBC advances land conservation, land stewardship and habitat restoration activities throughout the watershed of Buzzards Bay. BBC holds a total of 38 conservation easements (2,000 acres) and owns and operates a series of 5 publicly accessible river and bay reserves totaling about 400 acres.

The Wareham Land Trust’s mission is to conserve Wareham’s open space and natural resources, to unite citizens in a common goal of conservation and responsible land use, and to educate the public about the environmental and economic benefits of protecting open space and promoting sustainable development. The Wareham Land Trust is guided by a group of hard-working volunteer board members and supported by individuals and organizations throughout Wareham and the neighboring communities.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. 

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Buzzards Bay Coalition has proposed the following potential project for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:
1)  Complete baseline documentation reports for conservation land properties.

2)  Creation and maintenance of trails and public access facilities along a complex of conservation lands protected by the WLT, BBC and Town of Wareham within the lower Weweantic River corridor. 

3)  Develop and implement property specific public engagement plans for interpreting the natural and cultural history for one of Buzzards Bay Coalition’s sites. To do this, the member will help to develop and implement: natural history hikes, interpretive kiosks, short videos, content for property specific web pages, short pieces for local newspaper and radio, etc.

4)  Recruit and train volunteers to conduct stewardship and citizen science projects such as trail maintenance, invasive plant inventories and salt marsh/river habitat restoration activities.

5)  Onset Bay Reserve Land Management assistance, including public access and habitat improvements at BBC’s Wickets Island and Burgess Point properties.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • BA/BS in natural resources, forestry, land use planning or other scientific related field (experience may be substituted for education)
  • Knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software
  • Ability to navigate independently in the field utilizing map, compass, and GPS units
  • Ability to read and interpret various maps such as surveys, aerial photos, and USGS topographical maps
  • Experience working with natural systems and identifying plant and wildlife species
  • Comfortable working independently in both an office and field setting
  • Able to walk 3-4 miles a day over uneven terrain and work in a range of weather conditions
  • Comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint) and have the ability to quickly learn new programs

Desired Qualifications

  • Ability to effectively communicate with people from a variety of backgrounds
  • Ability to write detailed technical reports
  • Knowledge of the principles of natural lands management and water resource protection
  • Experience with the flora and fauna of coastal New England
  • Experience using and/or working around a variety of hand and power tools such as brush cutters, chainsaws, drills, hammers, etc.
  • Experience driving and operating 4×4 pickup trucks
  • Experience giving presentations and/or trainings to diverse audiences
  • Experience recruiting, training, and managing volunteers
  • Experience developing and completing projects both independently and with others

 

For questions about BBC’s Land Stewardship Coordinator position, contact Jack Sidar, sidar@savebuzzardsbay.org.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. 

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Buzzards Bay Coalition has proposed the following potential project for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:
1)  Complete baseline documentation reports for conservation land properties.

2)  Enhance access to conservation land properties by coordinating development of public access trails.

3)  Develop and implement property specific public engagement plans for interpreting the natural and cultural history for one of Buzzards Bay Coalition’s sites. To do this, the member will help to develop and implement: natural history hikes, interpretive kiosks, short videos, content for property specific web pages, short pieces for local newspaper and radio, etc.

4)  Recruit and train volunteers to conduct stewardship and citizen science projects such as trail maintenance, invasive plant inventories and salt marsh/river habitat restoration activities.

5)  Provide community outreach on topics such as water resource protection, wildlife habitat management, invasive species management and other stewardship topics.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • BA/BS in natural resources, forestry, land use planning or other scientific related field (experience may be substituted for education)
  • Knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software
  • Ability to navigate independently in the field utilizing map, compass, and GPS units
  • Ability to read and interpret various maps such as surveys, aerial photos, and USGS topographical maps
  • Experience working with natural systems and identifying plant and wildlife species
  • Comfortable working independently in both an office and field setting
  • Able to walk 3-4 miles a day over uneven terrain and work in a range of weather conditions
  • Comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint) and have the ability to quickly learn new programs

Desired Qualifications

  • Ability to effectively communicate with people from a variety of backgrounds
  • Ability to write detailed technical reports
  • Knowledge of the principles of natural lands management and water resource protection
  • Experience with the flora and fauna of coastal New England
  • Experience using and/or working around a variety of hand and power tools such as brush cutters, chainsaws, drills, hammers, etc.
  • Experience driving and operating 4×4 pickup trucks
  • Experience giving presentations and/or trainings to diverse audiences
  • Experience recruiting, training, and managing volunteers
  • Experience developing and completing projects both independently and with others

 

For questions about BBC’s Land Stewardship Coordinator position, contact Jack Sidar, sidar@savebuzzardsbay.org.

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles.

YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Buzzards Bay Coalition and Wareham Land Trust have proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education Coordinator:

  • Develop new outdoor exploration programs at Wareham and other local conservation areas for families from the greater Wareham region
  • Develop localized curriculum, trails, and interpretive signage to assist teachers in utilizing outdoor learning spaces
  • Develop a Wareham-based Outdoor Exploration Assistant volunteer program to expand outdoor education programs offered by the Coalition and Wareham Land Trust
  • Provide professional development programs for teachers to strengthen their skills in providing outdoor exploration programs
  • Develop and implement outdoor exploration programming for elementary school students
  • Engage youth groups in stewardship projects

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • Associate degree; experience may be substituted for education
  • Experience teaching or leading groups of all ages in the outdoors
  • Experience with hands-on conservation and stewardship projects
  • Strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort speaking in front of a wide range of audiences

Desired Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree or higher with a focus in education and/or environmental science
  • Experience with, and enthusiasm for, training and managing volunteers
  • Experience with experiential education and inquiry-based learning methods
  • Experience with curriculum development and lesson planning

 

For questions about this Youth Education Coordinator position, contact Cassie Lawson at Lawson@savebuzzardsbay.org.

East Quabbin Land Trust

The East Quabbin Land Trust works to foster the sustainable use of our natural and historic resources for the benefit of all generations through the conservation and stewardship of the farmlands, woodlands and waters in our region of Massachusetts. We envision a regional community that continues to care for its natural environment and supports a sustainable local economy, ensuring a high quality of life for generations to come. The work of the East Quabbin Land Trust is focused in central Massachusetts, an area with a diverse landscape of rivers, villages, rolling farmland, forested highlands, wetlands and working communities.  The small staff and dedicated volunteers at the East Quabbin Land Trust are mission-driven, always striving to engage more people of all ages and abilities in the care and conservation of our lands.  We take risks, we try new things, and we have fun doing this work as we make lasting changes. 

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands.

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. East Quabbin Land Trust has proposed the following potential projects for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  • Enhance and expand the Volunteer Steward Program by coordinating trainings, outings, and service days targeted around good forest stewardship practices, especially leading woods walks on properties recently logged.
  • Complete Baseline Documentation Reports for Towns that hold Conservation Restrictions but do not have reports documenting the condition of the conserved lands.
  • Expand the trail networks and trail maps to encourage more people to explore the outdoors.
  • Build partnerships to create an accessible trail and design a ParkRx program to build a network of healthy trails and programs for residents of the region.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher, and relevant experience
  • experience with hands-on land management or stewardship projects
  • comfortable serving independently in both an office and field setting
  • able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions, and navigate uneven terrain
  • comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office and able to quickly learn new programs
  • experience giving presentations and/or trainings to a diverse audience
  • experience training and/or managing volunteers
  • strong writing, communication and networking skills
  • strong interest in land stewardship and hands-on conservation projects
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or apprenticeship in a field related to natural resource management, landscape architecture/planning, agriculture/farming, or other related fields.
  • strong plant identification skills, and comfort walking in the woods
  • ability to write detailed technical reports
  • knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software
  • ability to navigate independently in the field utilizing map, compass, and GPS units
  • ability to read and interpret various maps, such as surveys, aerial photos, and USGS topos
  • experience with natural systems

 

For questions about East Quabbin Land Trust’s service positions, contact Cynthia Henshaw at chenshaw@EQLT.org.  No phone calls please.

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles.

YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. East Quabbin Land Trust has proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education Coordinator:

  • Engage youth in creating children’s literature projects that impart messages about land conservation or stewardship themes in Massachusetts
  • Engage youth in taking photographs of conserved lands to promote public awareness of these special places and the work of land trusts
  • Create videos highlighting youth impacts on EQLT preserves
  • Develop a family walking program that uses social media to reach new audiences
  • Expand and enhance programs for growing food with local schools
  • Develop curriculum for summer camp days on conservation land
  • Expand internship and externship opportunities through the local high schools

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • associate degree or higher, and relevant experience
  • experience teaching or leading groups in the outdoors, preferably youth
  • experience with hands-on land management or stewardship projects
  • strong presentation skills
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • strong interest in land stewardship and hands-on conservation projects
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental education, environmental and social justice, environmental policy and civic advocacy, or other social science related fields.
  • experience with experiential education, service learning, and inquiry-based learning methods
  • experience with curriculum development and lesson planning
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • ability to be flexible and possess a positive attitude
  • deep commitment to learning from and engaging with the volunteers and staff at the East Quabbin Land Trust to affect real change in our region

 

For questions about East Quabbin Land Trust’s service positions, contact Cynthia Henshaw at chenshaw@EQLT.org.  No phone calls please.

Groundwork Somerville

Groundwork Somerville strives to bring about the sustained regeneration, improvement and management of the physical environment through the development of community-based partnerships which empower people, businesses and organizations to promote environmental, economic and social well-being. Groundwork has been working to ensure Somerville residents have opportunities to make positive change in our community since 2000. On the ground, this mission takes form in our three program areas: Food and Farms, Youth Empowerment, and Sustainable Environment.  Groundwork strives to ensure our programs are guided by a social justice lens, seeking to ensure equity is at the forefront of decisions and actions in our city.

A service member at Groundwork Somerville will be serving in a blended capacity, with 50% of time in a Community Engagement role, and 50% of time spent in a Youth Education role. Both roles are described below, to provide a sense of the types of projects this individual will be working on.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens; hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food; disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; etc. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles. YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Groundwork Somerville has proposed the following potential project for their Youth Education/Community Engagement Coordinator:

  1. Expansion and formalization of our “School Garden Steward Program.” This program activates Somerville community members to help support both the maintenance and garden classes within our school gardens. As a “train the trainer” model, we seek to build a team of volunteer support to ensure high level of garden maintenance and programming across all school garden sites.

The Groundwork YEC/ CEC will work on revising and improving volunteer recruitment practices, assisting in the development and training of these volunteers, and supporting these volunteers at their school sites to be able to successfully complete garden tasks, as well as act as assistant teacher in our classrooms. These deliverables will be based on research of successful existing models across the country. Because this service member will also be providing direct service in the school gardens in the form of teaching and developing the gardens, they will also be drawing from this experience as they help to develop the School Garden Steward team.

 

  1. School Garden education: Groundwork Somerville supports school gardens in all 10 elementary schools in Somerville. The Groundwork YEC / CEC will provide school garden education programming for students at 3-5 of Somerville’s public and public charter schools around the city. This will range from school day programing to afterschool programming, and across age groups K-8th grade, with a strong focus on K-6th The focus will be on piloting new curriculum materials, including the World Crops curriculum and Pollinator curriculum.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • experience teaching or leading groups in the outdoors, preferably youth
  • experience with hands-on land management or stewardship projects
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental and social justice, environmental education, environmental policy and civic advocacy, social marketing and communication, or other social science related fields
  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience with experiential education, service learning, and inquiry-based learning methods
  • experience with curriculum development and lesson planning
  • experience in local government, or civic organizations
  • marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • experience with service learning programs

 

For questions about Groundwork Somerville’s service positions, contact Jess Bloomer at jess@groundworksomerville.org, or 617-628-9988. 

Growing Places

Growing Places started in 2001 to donate raised vegetable garden beds to people in need in North Central MA. Over 17 years we have made a conscious effort to be responsive to the need of the community; current programs and services include: Teaching Gardens for Kids; Garden on the Go; Learn & Grow Workshops; Community Teaching Gardens; Fitchburg Farmers Market and Greening the Gateway Cities. We envision a sustainable North Central Massachusetts comprised of healthy people and healthy communities.  Working with individuals, families, non-profit organizations, farmers, businesses, schools and public agencies, our mission is to inspire and connect the North Central MA community to create equitable access to healthy food and environmental sustainability through education, collaboration and advocacy.

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs. 

RCCs may assist their service site and partner organizations with collaborative projects and activities such as: developing Municipal Open Space and Recreation Plans; completing farmland and food systems mapping and inventories; securing and protecting land for use as community farms, forests, and parks; planning recreational greenways; developing farm-to-institution and buy local food campaigns; building farmer-to-farmland matching systems; and organizing trainings and outreach for open space planning, farmland protection, land access and affordability options. By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Growing Places has proposed the following potential project for their Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

To increase capacity of the North Central MA food system, our member will help to create and implement an assessment focused on producers and identify one high-risk community in which to pilot pop-up farmers markets and a CSA. This project builds on activities that are part of Community Health Network of North Central Massachusetts’ (CHNA9) Healthy Eating Working Group’s food access assessment. Strategies developed will directly address the need to increase opportunities that foster healthy, local affordable food access and to link producers and consumers in meaningful ways benefiting both groups. 

The Primary goals of theNorth Central MA Local Food System Assessment project are to:

  • Identify current local production’s geographic relationship to individuals at increased risk for food insecurity
  • Identify innovative ways to create a just local food system, focused on Farmers Markets as the driver
  • Create a sustainable Farmers Market hub model that can be replicated in similar communities

Key projects for the RCC at Growing Places:

  • Specific to the assessment, the member will: develop the design of the assessment including: researching best practices and models for food system assessments with a focus on producers; implementing the assessment via mapping; conducting key; stakeholder interviews and a policy analysis in our five target communities (Clinton, Fitchburg, Leominster, Gardner and Winchendon); creating a final report with key findings from the assessment and sharing the assessment with members of the CHNA9, farmers/producers, market managers, city officials and other entities with a stake in the food system.
  • Capacity Building: Engaging additional residents, farmers, businesses and community groups in the CHNA 9 Healthy Eating Work Group and supporting efforts of the group.
  • Researching best-practices from other areas that have a thriving local food system (farmers market and CSA) and developing respective strategies (programs, policies and systems) that provide local, affordable, culturally appropriate food to benefit residents, farmers and local businesses.
  • Piloting the identified strategy(s) to foster healthy, affordable, local food in one community identified as high priority.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with municipalities and producers on sustainable land use projects
  • passion for healthy eating, farmers markets and the local food system and its impact on community health, and environmental sustainability
  • comfortable speaking to groups
  • strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • ability and eagerness to connect and forge relationships with people of all backgrounds and experiences
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to urban planning, food systems planning, place-making or other related fields
  • computer mapping skills (GIS) are a plus
  • experience coordinating events and facilitating meetings with diverse stakeholders
  • experience developing public information and promotional materials
  • experience researching, developing, and implementing a strategy or program
  • Knowledge of local policies and systems related to food systems
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government and/or civic organizations
  • experience in land conservation or land use planning
  • Spanish language proficiency a plus

 

For questions about Growing Places service positions, contact Ayn Yeagle at ayn@growingplaces.org or 978-598-3723 x801.

Hilltown Land Trust

Hilltown Land Trust’s mission is to protect land and promote ecological diversity and health, respectful land stewardship, historic character and natural beauty in the Hilltowns of western Massachusetts. Hilltown Land Trust (HLT) serves thirteen rural towns in western Massachusetts, in which it holds 32 conservation restrictions (CRs) and owns 8 properties protecting over 3,700 acres. HLT maintains active hiking trails at three properties with development of a fourth property with trails in the coming year. In 2010, HLT and The Trustees of Reservations launched a partnership to combine the efforts and resources of these two non-profit land conservation organizations in the Hilltowns. HLT and The Trustees continue to function as independent entities, but now collaborate in order to increase the pace of land conservation in the Hilltowns.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Hilltown Land Trust has proposed the following potential project for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  • Plan and promote a series of high quality events, including hikes, skill-building activities, educational talks, a race, and arts-oriented events aimed at reaching diverse audiences and building the skills and engagement of our volunteers. Some of these events will be organized in partnership with recreational groups, schools, town committees, libraries, senior centers and garden clubs.

Development of this and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental and social justice, environmental education, environmental policy and civic advocacy, social marketing and communication, or other social science related fields.
  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government, or civic organizations
  • marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • experience with website and newsletter development and social media

 

For questions about Hilltown Land Trust’s service positions, contact Sally Loomis at sloomis@thetrustees.org.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. 

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Hilltown Land Trust (HLT) has proposed the following potential project for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  • Enhance and expand HLT’s Volunteer Land Steward Program by coordinating trainings, outings, and service days to monitor and maintain protected lands of HLT and partner organizations.
  • Establish and train local “friends” groups to help manage two properties owned by Hilltown Land Trust.
  • Develop Baseline Documentation Reports (BDRs) for new HLT Conservation Restrictions and/or update old BDRs for previously protected land.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • comfortable serving independently in both an office and field setting
  • able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions, and navigate uneven terrain
  • comfortable using computer programs such as Microsoft Office and able to quickly learn new programs
  • experience giving presentations and/or trainings to a diverse audience
  • experience with natural systems and identifying plant and wildlife species

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or apprenticeship in a field related to natural resource management, landscape architecture/planning, agriculture/farming
  • ability to write detailed technical reports
  • knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software
  • ability to navigate independently in the field using map, compass, and GPS units
  • ability to read and interpret surveys, aerial photos, and USGS topographic maps
  • experience training and managing volunteers

 

For questions about Hilltown Land Trust’s service positions, contact Sally Loomis at sloomis@thetrustees.org.

Just Roots

Just Roots is a nonprofit community organization located in Greenfield, Massachusetts. Our mission is to increase access to healthy, local food by connecting people, land, resources and know-how. We started a community farm on Greenfield town land in 2011 and began production of a diverse vegetable farm which, in 2018, will grow food for 300 families in Franklin County, MA. We donate over 10,000 pounds of food each year to our local food pantry and pay-what-you-can cafe. We operate a vibrant community garden and offer on-farm visits and volunteer opportunities throughout the year. Since the inception of Just Roots, we have been reinventing the CSA farm share model as a health intervention program. Believing strongly that belonging to a CSA farm share program has the power to change the way you eat for the long-term and improve health, Just Roots set out to create a farm share for every budget, addressing key barriers and increasing access for all.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Just Roots has proposed the following potential projects for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  1. Building out the Just Roots Food Access Workshop Series Program. Just Roots organizes a monthly Local Food Access Clinic — a resource providers fair with a featured skill-building workshop — in downtown Greenfield.  This event offers community members opportunities to try a new vegetable, see a new recipe in action, get basic medical screenings and learn about healthy food access opportunities regardless of what their budget might be from a myriad of service providers, all in a fun and festive environment.  Not all community members can make it to downtown Greenfield so the CEC will adapt and build out pieces of this clinic to take on the road!

 

Partners and Project:  The CEC will work with community partners including the staff and residents of low-income housing, community center, Center for Self-Reliance, local schools, YMCA and Franklin County House of Corrections to name a few, to identify which food access resources and educational opportunities are most critical. They will then lead a collaboration with community members and partners on building out a series of food access workshops that addresses those identified barriers.

  1. Just Roots is currently running a research study in collaboration with the Community Health Center of Franklin County and a doctor from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical looking at the health benefits of participating in a CSA farm share. The Community Engagement Coordinator will play a critical role in the final year of this study, to keep community members currently participating in the study engaged and a core team of research study volunteers organized. Health insurance companies have committed to using the results of our study to assess the possibility of an insurance-provided benefit for CSA shares, similar to the wellness benefit currently offered for gym membership. This has the potential to funnel significant private and state/federal funding into our local farms while making healthy food far more accessible to currently food insecure families! The CEC will build the capacity of the research team and lead strategy on participant engagement.
  2. The Just Roots Community Garden is a thriving 70-plot community space. The CEC will lead and collaborate with the Garden Circle, a group of dedicated volunteers, as well as the Just Roots farm crew, to continue to build the vibrancy of the garden, enrich the garden experience with yet-to-be-determined (can’t wait for your ideas!) events, and continue to grow a supportive and fun garden community culture!
  3. We’re always stewing up new ways to engage more deeply with our current community, and new ways to engage with community members we have yet to reach. Getting creative around Community Engagement is at the core of all of our work in the organization and we look forward to the creative directions our 2018 Community Engagement Coordinator brings to the table!

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups and partners
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong organizational, writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs
  • Enthusiasm! Desire to connect with community! Love of juggling many projects and interacting with people of many walks of life!

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental and social justice, environmental education, environmental policy and civic advocacy, social marketing and communication, or other social science related fields.
  • experience in community organizing
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • experience in human-subject research studies
  • experience in gardening
  • experience in customer service

For questions about Just Roots’ service positions, contact Rochelle Bellin, Rochelle@justroots.org  413.325.8969

Kestrel Land Trust

Since 1970, Kestrel Land Trust has conserved and cared for forests, farms, and riverways in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, while nurturing an enduring love of the land. Kestrel has conserved more than 25,000 acres throughout Amherst, Northampton, and their surrounding communities, and we are responsible for stewarding 3,000 acres of protected lands. Throughout our history, we have partnered with landowners, governmental agencies, citizen groups, and other organizations to protect farmland, woodlands, wildlife habitat, water resources, historic landscapes, and scenic vistas throughout the Valley. Along the river, rich soils are actively farmed, while the surrounding hills harbor beautiful forestlands and quaint villages, and the Mount Holyoke Range rises above all. A lively interest in conservation and outdoor recreation prevails in the community, and Kestrel leads regional efforts to maintain the natural qualities that make our Valley a place to love.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Kestrel Land Trust has proposed the following potential project for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

Build partnerships with non-conservation organizations to engage new communities and improve quality of life, to make conservation relevant to more a diverse range of people, including underserved communities.

Goals:

  • Initiate and cultivate relationships with new organizations based on strategic priorities
  • Plan and implement mutually beneficial events and programs to reach new audiences through these new partner organizations.
  • Engage community volunteers to assist with events and programs.

Potential Partners:

  • Social services nonprofits or agencies
  • Health organizations or providers
  • Schools and faith-based organizations

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental and social justice, environmental education, environmental policy and civic advocacy, social marketing and communication, or other social science related fields.
  • experience in planning and coordinating events
  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts

 

For questions about Kestrel Land Trust’s service positions, email office@kestreltrust.org. No phone calls please.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. 

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Kestrel Land Trust has proposed the following potential project for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  • Enhance and expand KLT’s Land & Trail Crew program by coordinating trainings and field project events. To strengthen regional capacity to manage conservation land, coordinate a minimum of two outdoor land stewardship events per month on KLT and partner land (Oct–Nov and May–July). With input from your supervisor and using KLT’s activities list as a guide, plan and lead field events, involving volunteers to the greatest extent possible. Activities will likely include trail creation and upkeep, kestrel nest box repair and maintenance, invasive species management, and other tasks as needed. Provide training to volunteers as needed. Collaborate with partners such as University of Massachusetts to engage volunteers, and seek to diversify KLT’s volunteer base through creative recruitment and developing engaging field opportunities.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • college degree in related field and relevant experience
  • knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software
  • ability to navigate independently in the field with map, compass, and GPS
  • ability to read and interpret various maps, such as surveys, aerial photos, and USGS topos
  • experience leading or participating in field work such as trail work, vegetation or wildlife management, etc.
  • knowledge of natural systems and identification of plant and wildlife species
  • comfort serving independently in both an office and field setting
  • able to walk 3-4 miles a day over uneven terrain in a range of weather conditions
  • comfort using computer programs such as Microsoft Office and the ability to learn new programs quickly

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher or certificate, training, or apprenticeship in a field related to natural resource management
  • experience coordinating field work and/or events
  • experience leading and managing volunteers
  • experience giving presentations and/or trainings to a diverse audience
  • ability to write detailed technical reports

 

For questions about this position, contact Chris Volonte: chris@kestreltrust.org

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust (Mount Grace) conserves significant farms, woodlands, and wild areas in North Central and Western Massachusetts for the benefit of the environment, the economy, and future generations. Mount Grace has helped to protect over 32,000 acres of land in our twenty-three town region comprised of small rural communities and larger urban centers. We are nationally recognized for projects that conserve entire landscapes and watersheds. We create innovative solutions that keep farmland undeveloped and affordable for farmers. We partner with community groups and schools to ensure that everyone has access to the outdoors and meaningful experiences in nature. Mount Grace also fiscally sponsors two unique partnerships: the North Quabbin Regional Landscape Partnership and the Greater Quabbin Food Alliance.

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs. 

RCCs may assist their service site and partner organizations with collaborative projects and activities such as: developing Municipal Open Space and Recreation Plans; completing farmland and food systems mapping and inventories; securing and protecting land for use as community farms, forests, and parks; planning recreational greenways; developing farm-to-institution and buy local food campaigns; building farmer-to-farmland matching systems; and organizing trainings and outreach for open space planning, farmland protection, land access and affordability options. By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust has proposed the following potential projects for their Farm Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

  • Plan, organize, and support local and regional food systems planning efforts, including coordination of the Greater Quabbin Food Alliance: a regional food systems network managed by Mount Grace;
  • Assist in education and outreach to increase the economic vitality and development of the North Quabbin regional food system;
  • Expand and enhance Mount Grace’s innovative farmland protection efforts across the region;
  • Engage with local farmers, towns, and community partners to identify and map farmland in Mount Grace’s service region to promote regional strategic planning for farmland conservation, and assist with landowner identification and outreach;
  • Provide educational opportunities to farmers and landowners to increase the pace of farm conservation and increase access to farmland for farmers in the greater Quabbin region.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills.
  • Comfortable working with people of diverse backgrounds and speaking to groups.
  • A strong interest in working with local and state partners on farmland conservation and food systems planning projects.
  • Able to work both independently and as a member of a team.
  • Knowledge and direct experience with current GIS technology.
  • Comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint) and have the ability to quickly learn new programs.
  • Ability to attend night and weekend events as needed. Must have access to a vehicle.

Desired Qualifications

  • Education background and/or direct experience in the fields of agriculture, natural resources, conservation, food systems, food access, and land use planning.
  • Experience coordinating
  • Experience developing public information
  • Experience recruiting, training, and managing
  • Experience with local government and/or civic

 

For questions about Mount Grace’s Farm RCC position, contact Jamie Pottern at 978-248-2055 x22 or pottern@mountgrace.org.

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs. 

RCCs may assist their service site and partner organizations with collaborative projects and activities such as: developing Municipal Open Space and Recreation Plans; completing farmland and food systems mapping and inventories; securing and protecting land for use as community farms, forests, and parks; planning recreational greenways; developing farm-to-institution and buy local food campaigns; building farmer-to-farmland matching systems; and organizing trainings and outreach for open space planning, farmland protection, land access and affordability options. By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust, as fiscal sponsor of the North Quabbin Regional Landscape Partnership, has proposed the following potential project for their Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

  • Organize a statewide conference for individuals (such as Open Space Committee members or other motivated volunteers) who are interested in promoting conservation and stewardship in their own communities. The conference and related outreach activities would be based on a peer-to-peer model of sharing that directly increases capacity of local partners and promotes tangible collaborations.

Development of this and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • a strong interest in collaborating with existing and potential partners, including municipal entities (such as conservation commissions and open space committees)
  • strong communication skills, including being comfortable speaking to groups
  • strong organizational and time management skills

Desired Qualifications

  • experience (or interest in) coordinating events
  • experience (or interest in) developing public information materials
  • experience (or interest in) training and managing volunteers
  • experience (or interest) in local government and/or civic organizations
  • experience (or interest) in land conservation
  • experience (or interest) in communicating about climate change on a local scale
  • computer mapping skills (GIS)

 

For questions about the Regional Collaboration Coordinator hosted at the North Quabbin Regional Landscape Partnership via Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust, contact Sarah Wells at wells@mountgrace.org or 978-248-2055 x23.

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles.

YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust has proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education Coordinator:

  • Organize field trips with local public schools to Mount Grace conservation lands to study and experience nature.
  • Partner with the Royalston Community School (elementary level) to develop science education projects at Mount Grace’s nearby Eagle Reserve Conservation Area with volunteering scientists and naturalists.
  • Engage with the Athol Community School (elementary level) to develop science education projects at the nearby South Athol Conservation Area, a conservation project of Mount Grace.
  • Coordinate volunteers to carry forward and improve community garden project with the Dexter Park Elementary School.
  • Organize our annual Family Camp-Out event which encourages families new to camping to come out for a fun overnight in the outdoors.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • experience teaching or leading groups in the outdoors, preferably youth
  • experience with hands-on land management or stewardship projects
  • strong presentation skills
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental education, environmental and social justice, environmental policy and civic advocacy, or other social science related fields.
  • experience with experiential education, service learning, and inquiry-based learning methods
  • experience with curriculum development and lesson planning
  • experience training and managing volunteers

 

For questions about Mount Grace’s Youth Engagement Coordinator position, contact Jay Rasku: rasku@mountgrace.org.

Mystic River Watershed Association

The mission of the Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA) is to protect and restore the Mystic River, its tributaries, and watershed lands for the benefit of present and future generations. Covering 76 square miles, the Mystic River Watershed is a living system full of fish and wildlife—including the largest river herring migration in the Commonwealth. The watershed includes thousands of acres of open space and parks along the river that offer recreational opportunities to the 700,000 community members in 22 cities and towns in greater Boston. The watershed starts in Reading and flows into Boston Harbor. It includes 44 lakes and ponds and dozens of tributaries. We are excited about the opportunity to bring a TerraCorps member to MyRWA!

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. 

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Mystic River Watershed Association has proposed the following potential projects for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  • Enhance our Invasive Species Removal program: In Medford, parts of the Mystic River are barely passable due to invasive water chestnuts that are working hard to extend their habitat from shore to shore. With the help of more than 900 volunteers each year, MyRWA works to remove the invasive weed, water chestnut, from the Mystic River and Arlington Reservoir, as well as Oriental bittersweet from waterfront parks. We partner with local businesses and community groups to offer fun and rewarding community stewardship events. TerraCorps members will help manage and grow this program.
  • Expand our Volunteer Herring Monitoring program: The Mystic River hosts the largest river herring migration in the Commonwealth. These fish, which are a species of concern, serve as an important part of the ocean food web. To ensure a healthy ecosystem for herring, thorough data needs to be collected and shared with the Department of Marine Fisheries. To protect this important migration TerraCorps members will help recruit, train, and manage volunteers for current and new monitoring locations.
  • Assist with community outreach for the Mystic Greenways Initiative: As the most highly urbanized watershed in New England, the Mystic lacks connected, safe places for active transportation and recreation. Our organization is working to create and enhance more than 25 miles of waterfront parks and paths that will result in a world-class recreation and active transportation system. We need help engaging diverse communities across the watershed as we implement this vision. TerraCorps members will help with this community engagement by assisting with public workshops, conducting surveys and interviews, and leading on-site events.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • comfortable working independently in both an office and field setting
  • able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions, and navigate uneven terrain
  • comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office and able to quickly learn new programs
  • must be able to communicate effectively in writing and in person, and be comfortable with social media platforms
  • experience giving presentations and/or trainings to a diverse audience
  • experience training and/or managing volunteers

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or apprenticeship in a field related to environmental science, natural resource management, landscape architecture/planning, or other related fields.
  • experience planning large events or working with large groups
  • experience with natural systems: identifying plant and wildlife species

For questions about Mystic River Watershed Association’s service positions, contact Erica Wood at Erica.wood@mysticriver.org.

New Entry Sustainable Farming Project

New Entry Sustainable Farming Project (New Entry)  is a local, regional, and national leader in the growing food systems movement built around the concepts of sustainable farming, land conservation, access to locally grown food, and environmental stewardship. Our mission is to improve our local and regional food systems by training the next generation of farmers to produce food that is sustainable, nutritious, and culturally-appropriate and making this food accessible to individuals regardless of age, mobility, ethnicity, or socio-economic status.  In doing this work, we provide critical training, career development, and economic opportunity to new farmers including support to link beginning farmers with land access opportunities.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people. This position supports land conservation through food access.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. New Entry has proposed the following potential project for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  1. Support all aspects of the New Entry Food Hub program to:
  • Engage in meaningful and compassionate food access projects through support for farmers and for our food access share program,
  • Help beginning farmers access solid markets for their crops while they work to grow their businesses,
  • Document the needs of beginning farmers through listening sessions and communicate those needs with our technical assistance providers, and
  • Serve directly each week with farmers at the Food Hub to discuss their land access needs and to collaborate with strategic partners to educate them about land ownership/access opportunities and other technical assistance opportunities.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs
  • access to a reliable vehicle for daily transportation
  • valid driver’s license
  • ability to serve inside and outside and through variable weather conditions

Desired Qualifications

  • additional relevant educational experience
  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • marketing experience/ experience developing public informational materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • experience with Salesforce
  • fluent Khmer speaker/ability to provide translation services
  • experience with sustainable agriculture/ organic gardening
  • experience with produce food safety, harvest and post-harvest handling practices
  • experience supporting networking opportunities for diverse audiences

For questions about New Entry’s CEC position, contact Lisa Mosca: lisa.mosca@tufts.edu.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands.  This position will support land conservation through food access support.

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, monitoring and maintaining urban farmland, restoring wildlife habitat, mitigating erosion, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. New Entry has proposed the following potential project for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  1. Support the New Entry farmer training program to provide direct technical assistance to beginning farmers at our Food Hub, in our course trainings, and in our incubator farm fields by working as an intermediary to help farmers with crop availability forecasting, invoicing, and recordkeeping when they drop off produce, as well as providing educational information about beneficial opportunities including land access opportunities and other agricultural events and service providers that can assist beginning farmers with benefits.
  2. Provide education of best practices in soil building, nutrient management, recordkeeping, harvest and post-harvest handling, food safety, and organic pest, weed and disease prevention, and control using a case management model.
  3. Build relationships with beginning farmers and engage as an active listener to learn and document farm needs to relay to New Entry staff.
  4. Host listening sessions and one on one conversations with New Entry farmers to understand their challenges and needs as well as their successes and support for the food system. With this understanding, promote New Entry farmers to landowners, conservation groups, and other community groups that are frequently looking for responsible farmers to steward their land. This will be done through implementation of education at speaker bureaus, community outreach and engagement at local community events, agricultural conferences, and other opportunities that promote farmer needs and better support.
  5. Support volunteer engagement across New Entry programs to better support our beginning farmer success.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • comfortable serving independently in both an office and field setting
  • able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions, and navigate uneven terrain
  • comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office and able to quickly learn new programs
  • experience giving presentations and/or trainings to a diverse audience
  • experience training and/or managing volunteers
  • access to your own vehicle/reliable transportation
  • valid driver’s license

Desired Qualifications

  • additional relevant educational experience
  • ability to read, interpret and manipulate various maps, such as surveys, aerial photos, USGS topos, Advanced Google Maps functions
  • experience with natural systems: farming, gardening, and/or identifying plant and wildlife species
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience with Salesforce
  • fluent Khmer speaker/ability to provide translation services
  • experience with sustainable agriculture/ organic gardening
  • experience with produce purchasing/harvest and post-harvest handling

 

For questions about New Entry’s CEC position, contact Lisa Mosca lisa.mosca@tufts.edu.

North County Land Trust

North County Land Trust is a non-profit, regional land conservation organization founded in 1992 to protect, preserve and promote the natural resources of north central Massachusetts. NCLT serves 14 communities and focuses on identifying natural resources, working lands, and landscapes whose conservation is of the highest priority; conserving land in perpetuity for future generations; and engaging communities to understand and appreciate their natural environment and the importance of conservation. Our office is located on conservation land owned by the Trustees of Reservations in Leominster, MA.

A service member at North County Land Trust will be serving in a blended capacity, with 50% of time in a Community Engagement role, and 50% of time spent in a Youth Education role.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens; hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food; disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; etc. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles. YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. North County Land Trust has proposed the following potential project for their Community Engagement/ Youth Education Coordinator:

  1. Improve upon and expand the successful outreach and education programs established by the previous TerraCorps members. These projects include: teaching natural science explorations within Longsjo Middle school in Fitchburg, weekly visits with the Boy and Girls Club in Gardner, and community science fair opportunities throughout the region.
  2. Expand outings and education programs by cultivating relationships with local organizations, urban neighborhoods, and community groups and implementing programs that engage community members in the natural world.
  3. Collaborate with NCLT staff and other TerraCorps members within the region to think strategically about engaging citizens in our communities and responding to their unique needs.
  4. Develop systems and frameworks to streamline and expand capacity for North County Land Trust’s communications and outreach efforts.
  5. Expand and implement creative and engaging ways in which we can bring awareness of North County Land Trust and our core advocacy issues (environmental awareness, land conservation, appropriate development, human wellness, universal access and connection to nature) to new constituents.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental education, environmental and social justice, environmental policy and civic advocacy, or other social science related fields.
  • experience teaching or leading groups in the outdoors, preferably youth
  • strong presentation skills
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • ability to represent NCLT at local events and cultivate partnerships through personal outreach and connection
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience with hands-on conservation and stewardship projects
  • experience with experiential education, service learning, and inquiry-based learning methods
  • experience with curriculum development and lesson planning
  • experience engaging with local government or civic organizations
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • an understanding of the importance of including diverse populations in our work

 

For questions about NCLT’s service positions, contact Anna Wilkins at 978-466-3900 or awilkins@northcountylandtrust.org.

Sudbury Valley Trustees

Sudbury Valley Trustees (SVT) is a regional land trust that conserves land and protects wildlife habitat in the Concord, Assabet, and Sudbury river basin for the benefit of present and future generations. We care for some of this region’s most important forests, wetlands, and grasslands—natural areas that support wildlife habitat, working farms, and recreational trails. As of 2017, SVT cares for more than 4,800 acres on 89 reservations and 75 Conservation Restrictions and maintains more than 55 miles of trails. We collaborate with numerous partner organizations, and our work is supported by 2,900 members and 200 volunteers.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Sudbury Valley Trustees has proposed the following potential project for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

The CEC will engage and mobilize more people to participate in conservation. In particular, the CEC will help SVT build a pipeline to outreach and ultimately to membership. In order to achieve this goal, examples include:

  1. Collaboration and engagement of diverse partner groups. The CEC will engage more traditional partners (e.g. like-minded conservation and environmental groups), while also engaging organizations whose main focus/mission is very different from SVT. This could include organizations/ groups with a focus on healthcare, housing insecurity, and diversity/inclusion. The CEC will work to align each organization’s strengths for the benefit of all.
  2. Greatly expanding SVT’s trail presence, in collaboration with SVT’s Stewardship team. The CEC will be physically present on SVT trails and have the skill set to maximize communication with visitors, through face-to-face conversations and creation of proper marketing materials. In addition to being physically present, the CEC will help SVT grow its communication avenues, whether that is through increased volunteers, better signage, more programming, or other strategies.
  3. Research outreach avenues and determine which will help SVT maximize its brand awareness to the communities we represent. This includes identifying how people gather information about their region and community through Newspapers, social media, email, multilingual, community gatherings, etc. The CEC will build outreach lists and strategies and help SVT focus on ones that have the greatest potential for success.

Development of this and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications

  • a strong interest in environmental and social justice, environmental education, environmental policy and civic advocacy, social marketing and communication, or other social science related fields.
  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government, or civic organizations
  • marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • experience with service learning programs

 

For questions about Sudbury Valley Trustees service positions, please contact Michael Sanders, msanders@svtweb.org.  No phone calls please.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of conservation land. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, local land trusts, civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of conservation land. 

LSCs may assist their service site by: surveying and monitoring conservation land, building and maintaining recreational trails, restoring wildlife habitat, and improving public access to open spaces. By providing training and organizing collaborative land stewardship projects, they increase resources for community land stewardship projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. One of the capacity building projects for the Land Stewardship Coordinator with Sudbury Valley Trustees (SVT) is described below.

SVT will be increasing its support to local land trusts and municipal conservation committees to build regional capacity for and collaboration on land stewardship. The LSC will serve with SVT’s Director of Land Stewardship and stewardship staff to assess community-level conservation land stewardship priorities and needs. The LSC will meet with and interview local land trust and municipal conservation representatives and /or boards. With this information, the LSC will develop training and service days to address those priorities and needs. We anticipate the stewardship issues will focus on invasive species, deer, field and early successional habitats, and connecting trail networks. This initiative is part of continued development of the capacity of the West Suburban Conservation Council and the Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area, two regional conservation collaboratives.

Other potential projects include collaborating with community groups on developing pollinator habitats and gardens, connecting trail networks, and hosting invasive plant identification, mapping and control trainings. 

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Essential Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in natural sciences, natural resources management or related field
  • Knowledge of New England natural communities, plants and wildlife
  • Experience with plant identification and some knowledge of invasive plant control
  • Solid interpersonal communication and group presentation skills
  • Experience working with, training or managing volunteers
  • Comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office and able to quickly learn new programs
  • Basic experience with ArcGIS software
  • Ability to serve independently in both an office and field setting
  • Able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions and navigate uneven terrain

Desired Qualifications

  • Trail maintenance experience
  • Ability to write detailed technical reports
  • Ability to navigate independently in the field utilizing map, compass, and GPS units
  • Ability to read and interpret various maps, such as surveys, aerial photos, and USGS topos

 

No phone calls please.

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs. 

RCCs may assist their service site and partner organizations with collaborative projects and activities such as: developing Municipal Open Space and Recreation Plans; completing farmland and food systems mapping and inventories; securing and protecting land for use as community farms, forests, and parks; planning recreational greenways; developing farm-to-institution and buy local food campaigns; building farmer-to-farmland matching systems; and organizing trainings and outreach for open space planning, farmland protection, land access and affordability options. By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Sudbury Valley Trustees has proposed the following potential project for their Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

  1. Plan and coordinate conservation education programs for a regional consortium of land trusts, conservation commissions, agencies, and landowners in MetroWest Boston known as the West Suburban Conservation Council (WSCC). The RCC will coordinate with land protection and stewardship staff at SVT to organize two meetings of the entire WSCC, and meetings of sub-working groups as needed and desired. The RCC will help develop agendas, secure meeting spaces, line up speakers, create materials and presentations, and coordinate other logistics as necessary. The RCC will assist with communications to the WSCC and sub-working groups as needed in between meetings.
  2. Other projects might include organizing SVT’s annual legislative breakfast, and researching relevant legislation and pending legislation; organizing workshops, such as conservation options for landowners; and providing general assistance for land protection projects.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • a strong interest in serving with municipalities on sustainable land use projects
  • comfortable speaking to groups
  • strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs
  • Knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software

Desired Qualifications

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to landscape architecture, urban planning, food systems planning, natural resource planning, or other related fields.
  • experience coordinating events
  • experience developing public informational materials
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government and/or civic organizations
  • experience in land conservation or land use planning

 

No phone calls please.

Wildlands Trust

Wildlands Trust works throughout Southeastern Massachusetts to conserve and permanently protect native habitats, farmland, and lands of high ecological and scenic value that serve to keep our communities healthy and our residents connected to the natural world. Since our founding in 1973, we have facilitated the protection of nearly 10,000 acres of land across our 1,500-square-mile region. We envision a future where open land is abundant, our water is clean, and forests, farms, wetlands, fields, ponds, and coastal areas are commonplace sightings on our landscape.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC’s demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens;  hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food;  disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CEC’s build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Wildlands Trust has proposed the following potential projects for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  1. Design a themed public program series for the winter and spring. We host a variety of public programs at our headquarters and out on our trails. Under the guidance of the Outreach and Education Manager, the CEC will design and host a themed winter lecture series to be held at our headquarters in the Community Conservation Barn and a spring walking series to be held in the City of Brockton. Brockton is an environmental justice community in which Wildlands Trust and the City have a connected trail system that have recently been updated with new parking areas, trailhead kiosks, trailside interpretive signage, and new boardwalks.
  2. Develop a volunteer hike leader program. By training trusted volunteer hike leaders, Wildlands Trust can expand our capacity to offer an abundance of public programs throughout our 1,500-square-mile region. Under the guidance of the Outreach and Education Manager and other staff, the CEC will develop and lead a training program for volunteer hike leaders. This program will create a standard for participant safety and volunteer responsibility to be used by Wildlands Trust for years to come.
  3. General assistance with educational programs, including adult public programs, youth environmental programming, member programs, and volunteer programs.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications

  • Associate’s degree or higher
  • A strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • Comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • Strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Familiarity with Microsoft Office programs
  • CPR/First Aid certified or willing to obtain

Desired Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental and social justice, environmental education, environmental science, outdoor recreation, environmental policy and civic advocacy, social marketing and communication, or other social science related fields.
  • Experience leading groups in an outdoor setting
  • Experience training and managing volunteers
  • Experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • Marketing experience or experience developing public informational materials
  • Familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • Experience with service learning programs
  • WFA certified or willing to obtain

 

For questions about Wildlands Trust service positions, contact Rachel Calderara at rcalderara@wildlandstrust.org.

AmeriCorps Member Eligibility Requirements

This year’s TerraCorps program will run from August 27, 2018 through July 26, 2019. All members are expected to serve full-time, commit to serve for the entire eleven-month term, and complete at least 1,700 hours of service, including time spent in trainings and service with the full TerraCorps team. Weekly service averages 37 hours and commonly includes some night and/or weekend activities.

As a program of AmeriCorps, Terracorps applicants must also meet the following AmeriCorps requirements:

  • A US citizen, US national, Lawful Permanent Resident Alien of the U.S. and/or tribal member
  • At least 18 years old
  • A minimum of a high school diploma or GED
  • No more than three previous terms as an AmeriCorps member
  • Pass a criminal history background check, including an FBI check

AmeriCorps programs provide equal opportunities. TerraCorps will recruit and select persons in all positions to ensure a diverse and inclusive climate without regard to race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, veteran status, color, political affiliation, creed, national origin, marital status, or any other status as protected by federal, state, and local laws. We encourage applications from individuals with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodations for interviews and service upon request.

Member Compensation and Benefits

  • TerraCorps members will receive a living allowance of up to $14,000 (pre-tax) over the 11-month term of service, which is $583.33 per 24 biweekly pay periods.
  • TerraCorps assists members in obtaining health insurance coverage through gov. Reimbursement of costs may be available.
  • Childcare assistance may be provided in cases of financial need.
  • Upon successful completion of a term of service, AmeriCorps members receive a taxable $5,920 education award that can be used for future education or to pay off existing school loans. See gov/resources/edaward for info and restrictions.
  • TerraCorps members are eligible for forbearance of most federally-guaranteed student loans, as well as payment of interest accrued during service.
  • TerraCorps members will receive mentorship, training, and career development opportunities while serving directly with community-based nonprofits.
  • TerraCorps members experience the personal rewards of national service
    and community engagement.

Note: TerraCorps members are responsible for their own housing and must have access to reliable transportation.

TerraCorps is a grant program contingent upon renewal of federal funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS). CNCS grants to AmeriCorps programs in Massachusetts are administered by the Massachusetts Service Alliance.

To Apply to Become a TerraCorps Member

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Send your completed application form along with a cover letter and resume to: admin@terracorps.org