Apply To Become a Half-Term Member Today!

This winter, we have 4 open half-term member positions. Half-term members will serve in full-time, 6-month positions (February 12th- July 27, 2018) in which they complete at least 900 hours of service with one of our partner organizations.  These four half-term members will join the 34 other full-term members currently serving across the State. Members receive a living allowance, education award, and additional AmeriCorps benefits (at bottom of page).

Please explore the links below to see what partner organizations are looking to host half-term members. Details on how to apply can be found at the bottom of the page.

Open Half-term Member Positions

GTC

Gardening the Community will be hosting a split Land Stewardship Coordinator/ Regional Conservation Coordinator

GTC is a food justice organization engaged in youth development, urban agriculture, and sustainable living to build healthy and equitable communities. GTC plays an important role in Springfield’s food justice movement, working to create more access to healthy food and building toward an equitable local food system. Youth development and urban agriculture are at the center of this work, with Read More

youth leadership development built into all levels of the organization. GTC works with youth to grow food on vacant lots and organizes to expand healthy, affordable food access in the Mason Square neighborhoods of Springfield. GTC’s vision includes building a vibrant, healthy food system with just and equal access to it – one that recognizes and addresses inequity, so racism no longer determines the health or well-being of a neighborhood or community. GTC just purchased land that it is developing into the first permanent, community-controlled urban farm in Springfield.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their service sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands including urban agriculture sites like those run by GTC.

Regional Conservation Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs.

Proposed projects for work with GTC include:

  • Collaborate with staff to bring our Walnut St. Farm’s new Community Farm Stand on-line, including:
    • coordinating community engagement and assisting with planning process
    • locating resources as needed
    • developing local partnerships to enhance visibility and public access
    • Organizing a spring community celebration and ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the Community Farm Stand and a tour of the Walnut St. Farm, ensuring stakeholders are represented
    • develop press release and implement media and neighborhood outreach plan
  • Secure sources for free or low-cost farming supplies (compost, wood chips, seeds, etc.) and their timely delivery for GTC’s use and volunteer impact days
  • Coordinate with GTC staff to create a system for monitoring and utilizing food waste and a compost plan for each GTC farm site

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out two or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. GTC has proposed the following potential projects for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  • Enhance and expand GTC’s Volunteer Impact Program by coordinating trainings, group service projects, and service days to better manage our farm sites, with a focus on tasks needed during the spring of 2018 on our Walnut St. Farm. This will include reaching out to existing and new volunteer partners and setting up a volunteer database for the organization’s long-term use.
  • Identify ways to gather and use compostable waste produced by neighborhood businesses and homes; set up systems and work with staff to implement a plan.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first month of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications:

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • comfortable serving independently in both an office and farm/community setting
  • comfortable working as part of a multi-racial team and with communities of color
  • understanding of and commitment to addressing issues of food and racial justice
  • able to work outside for up to 6 hours in a range of weather conditions
  • comfortable utilizing computer programs such as Microsoft Office; able to quickly learn new programs such as Neon CRM (our database system)
  • ability to multi-task and manage projects

Desired Qualifications:

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or apprenticeship in a field related to natural resource management, landscape architecture/planning, agriculture/farming, public health or other related fields
  • ability to write detailed reports
  • experience giving presentations and/or trainings to a diverse audience
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • bilingual Spanish/English

For questions about GTC’s service position, contact Ibrahim Ali at 413.693.5340 x1 after Jan. 13

New Entry Sustainable Farming Project will be hosting a Community Engagement Coordinator

New Entry Sustainable Farming Project (New Entry) is a local, regional, and national leader in the growing food systems movement built around the concepts of sustainable farming, land conservation, access to locally grown food, and environmental stewardship. Our mission is to improve local and regional food systems by training the next generation of farmers to produce food that is sustainable  Read More

and nutritious. For 20 years, we’ve been providing tangible, hands-on support to new farmers through classroom and field training, career development, and economic opportunity.

New Entry envisions vibrant, healthy communities where all residents have access to quality, healthy, fresh and locally grown food and where farmland is actively stewarded to build soil health and provide ecological benefits. We also value the role that local farmers play in the food system: as stewards of the land, cultivators of our health and nourishment through quality food production, and as socially responsible entrepreneurs who contribute to the fabric of our local economies.

To achieve this vision, New Entry supports new and potential farmers all the way from being curious about farming to operating sustainable businesses. Throughout that journey, we provide assistance in all aspects of farming to our next generation of farmers.


Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC)
build the long-term capacity of their service sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programing, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CECs demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of open space, CECs build connections between land and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives.

CECs may partner with homeless shelters or food pantries to build community gardens; hospitals to build wellness gardens and walking paths, neighborhood groups to revitalize urban parks and greenways; farmers markets to increase community access to locally grown food; disability groups to create wheelchair accessible outings; youth and adult groups to inspire artistic expression; public health programs to support recovery; and any underrepresented community groups who want to provide access to the outdoors for recreational and entertainment purposes. By engaging with diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CECs build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out two or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. New Entry Sustainable Farming Project is undertaking the following initiatives in which a TerraCorps member could be involved:

New Entry seeks a TerraCorps member to bolster outreach capacity and support the farmland access needs of our farmer training programs, which require access to available, affordable, and secure land tenure. By collaborating with community groups (land trusts, conservation commissions, agricultural commissions, municipal entities and interested private landowners), the member will help New Entry to continue increasing the number of prospective new farmers who will participate in our conservation and sustainable agriculture-focused farm training curriculum. The member will also play a role in helping New Entry’s farmers to locate suitable, affordable land to start farming or expand to independently managed farms beyond our incubator training farm program. Currently, there are no organizations in Massachusetts providing a highly tailored or individualized farmland search and land matching service for beginning farmers.

Additionally, a TerraCorps member could assist in New Entry’s collaborative project to secure the future viability of local farms and farmlands through farm family succession planning and raising community awareness of farms that are in jeopardy of shuttering or developing.

Based on these initiatives, the following potential projects are proposed for the Community Engagement Coordinator:

  • Collaborate with local land trusts and stewardship groups to bring together community members and farmland owners to look ahead at farm succession plans and to investigate the many farms that are in danger of shuttering or developing.
  • Help design and teach sustainable farming curriculum to new and established farmers.
  • Investigate the economies of cover cropping and disseminate findings to new and established independent farms throughout Massachusetts and beyond. Findings will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals with every contributing author listed, including affiliations.
  • Collaborate closely with alumni to help them address land access and stewardship issues.
  • Collaborate closely with staff to consult with alumni and regional farmers to help them gain access to federal SNAP programs and better position their farm business to qualify for FSA lending, which will ultimately increase active farmland in Massachusetts.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first month of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Essential Qualifications:

  • undergraduate degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a related field
  • a strong interest in serving with diverse community groups, landowners, and municipalities
  • comfortable presenting in front of groups
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications:

  • experience in community needs assessment
  • experience with diversity and inclusion issues
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience in local government, or civic organizations
  • marketing experience or experience developing public information materials
  • familiarity with land conservation in Massachusetts
  • experience with service learning programs
  • graphic design abilities

 

For questions about New Entry Sustainable Farming Project’s service positions, contact Justin Chase at justin.chase@tufts.edu. No phone calls please.

The Walden Woods Project will be hosting a Youth Education Coordinator

The Walden Woods Project preserves the land, literature and legacy of Henry David Thoreau to foster an ethic of environmental stewardship and social responsibility. The Project achieves this mission through the integration of conservation, education, research and advocacy. Our education programs are built on the philosophy of Thoreau and grounded in the land and historic resources Read More

of Walden Woods and Thoreau Country, engaging students, educators and lifelong learners in the United States and around the world. Our programs foster an ethic of environmental stewardship and social responsibility, both cornerstones of Thoreau’s philosophy.


Youth Education Coordinators (YEC)
build the long-term capacity of their service site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles.

YECs may help their service site to engage with educators and volunteers to guide youth in environmental inquiry and discovery, school and community garden projects, urban tree stewardship projects, urban pocket park projects, and “green jobs” training and internship programs. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out two or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. The Walden Woods Project has proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education Coordinator:

  • Enhance our group visit program and expand its impact beyond our current reach, by a) developing relationships with organizations/audiences that we aren’t currently serving in significant numbers (such as elementary and middle schools, underserved districts, alternative schooling programs), b) building relationships with groups that will visit outside of our busiest weeks of the year, and c) co-creating curriculum that will complement and enhance the group visit experience;
  • Help us to complete and launch “Henry’s Hat,” an interdisciplinary, nature-based curriculum for grades 3-5, which uses Thoreau’s practices of observation, inquiry, writing and critical thinking to engage this age group;
  • Develop educational materials that would engage groups in nature-based programming at our property/trails on Bear Garden Hill, just one half-mile from Walden Pond; and
  • Other projects that help us to increase the accessibility and effectiveness of our place-based programs for students in Walden Woods, focusing on reaching new audiences and the potential for educational programs at The Farm at Walden Woods, our organic farm adjacent to the historic Walden Woods.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first month of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

 

Essential Qualifications:

  • high school diploma and relevant experience
  • experience teaching or leading groups in the outdoors, preferably youth
  • experience with curriculum development and lesson planning
  • strong presentation skills
  • strong writing, communication, and networking skills
  • ability to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Henry David Thoreau or a genuine interest in learning about his life and writings
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications:

  • associate’s degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to environmental education, environmental and social justice, or other related field.
  • experience with hands-on conservation and stewardship projects
  • experience with experiential education, service learning, and/or inquiry-based learning methods

 

For questions about the Walden Woods Project’s service position, contact Whitney Retallic, Director of Education, at education@walden.org or 781-259-4721.

The Urban Farming Institute will be hosting a Regional Conservation Coordinator

The Urban Farming Institute develops and promotes urban farming as a commercial sector that recovers abandoned urban land, brings urban residents closer to food production and nurtures a healthy local food system. UFI trains urban farmers, operates an urban farming enterprise, acquires and develops urban farm sites, co-sponsors the annual MA Urban Farming Conference with the Massachusetts Read More

Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR), conducts  workshops on food and farming, and participates in city and state food access, food policy and food system councils. UFI has eight sites that are currently farmed or in development for farming. We will move into our new headquarters at the historic Fowler Clark Epstein Farm in Mattapan in early 2018, and we will plant our first greenhouse in 2018.

UFI is a small organization and has focused its resources primarily in training and human development. To date we have pursued our land development in partnerships. In 2017, UFI incorporated the Urban Farming Institute Community Land Trust (UFI CLT) which is the first CLT created specifically to support urban farms and farmers growing for market. The CLT is the vehicle by which UFI is insuring the protection of land acquired for urban farms. With the new CLT and a growing track record, UFI is seeking to expand its capacity for the extremely important land conservation work that is reclaiming derelict vacant lots and turning them into verdant and productive landscapes. Our work ahead includes operationalizing the CLT.

As a founding member of the Greater Boston Community Land Trust (GBCLT) Network, UFI has excellent partners and resources for reciprocal learning. The GBCLT Network meets monthly to share information and practices as well as to plan and advocate for better policies. Currently the Network is focusing on the upcoming planning priorities for the Community Preservation Act Funds; several housing campaigns, a proposed tax credit for land donation, and holding a law clinic for CLTs. We also sit on the Mayor’s Food Access Council and participate in the MA Food Systems Forum, to name a few.

Regional Conservation Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their service sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs.

RCCs may assist their service site and partner organizations with collaborative projects and activities such as: developing Municipal Open Space and Recreation Plans; completing farmland and food systems mapping and inventories; securing and protecting land for use as community farms, forests, and parks; planning recreational greenways; developing farm-to-institution and buy local food campaigns; building farmer-to-farmland matching systems; and organizing trainings and outreach for open space planning, farmland protection, land access and affordability options. By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out two or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. The Urban Farming Institute has proposed the following potential projects for their Regional Conservation Coordinator:

  • Adapt and develop the stewardship and management policies for the new UFI CLT, the first of its kind, including local education and outreach to build participation in the CLT governance.
  • Document, synthesize, and analyze the data on Boston’s urban farm site acquisition and development experience since the 2013 regulatory change that created urban farming as a legal land use. Prepare a plan for reducing barriers and establishing processes.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first month of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Essential Qualifications:

  • associates degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to landscape architecture, urban planning, food systems planning, natural resource planning, or other related fields
  • a strong interest in land conservation in urban environments
  • strong organizational skills and initiative
  • comfortable speaking to groups
  • willingness to conduct primary research
  • strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • able to serve independently and as a member of a team
  • familiarity with Microsoft Office programs

Desired Qualifications:

  • postgraduate degree or higher and/or certificate, training, or internship in a field related to landscape architecture, urban planning, food systems planning, natural resource planning, or other related fields.
  • experience in urban land development and land use planning and regulation
  • experience in policy implementation
  • computer mapping skills (GIS) are a plus
  • experience coordinating events
  • experience developing public information materials
  • experience training and managing volunteers
  • experience with local government and/or civic organizations

 

For questions about The Urban Farming Institute’s RCC service position, please contact Barbara Knecht at Barbara@StrategiesForCities.com.

AmeriCorps Member Eligibility Requirements

This year’s TerraCorps half-term position will run from February 12th to July 27, 2018. All members are expected to serve full-time, commit to serve for the entire 24-week term, and complete at least 900 hours of service, including time spent in trainings and service with the full TerraCorps team. Weekly service averages 38 hours and commonly includes some night and/or weekend activities.

As a program of AmeriCorps, Terracorps applicants must also meet the following AmeriCorps requirements:

  • A US citizen, US national, Lawful Permanent Resident Alien of the U.S. and/or tribal member
  • At least 18 years old
  • A minimum of a high school diploma or GED
  • No more than three previous terms as an AmeriCorps member
  • Pass a criminal history background check, including an FBI check

AmeriCorps programs provide equal opportunities. TerraCorps will recruit and select persons in all positions to ensure a diverse and inclusive climate without regard to race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, veteran status, color, political affiliation, creed, national origin, marital status, or any other status as protected by federal, state, and local laws. We encourage applications from individuals with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodations for interviews and service upon request. Medical screening is NOT required.

Member Compensation and Benefits
  • Living allowance of up to $6,315 (pre-tax) over the 6-month term of service, which is $526.25 per 24 biweekly pay periods.
  • Health insurance coverage through masshealth.gov. Reimbursement of costs may be available.
  • Childcare assistance may be provided in cases of financial need.
  • Education award of $2,960, received after successful completion service, can be used for future education or to pay off existing school loans. See gov/resources/edaward for info and restrictions.
  • Eligibility for forbearance of most federally-guaranteed student loans, as well as payment of interest accrued during service.
  • Mentorship, training, and career development opportunities while serving directly with community-based nonprofits.
  • Experience the personal rewards of national service
    and community engagement.

Note: TerraCorps members are responsible for their own housing and must have access to reliable transportation.

TerraCorps is a grant program contingent upon renewal of federal funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS). CNCS grants to AmeriCorps programs in Massachusetts are administered by the Massachusetts Service Alliance.

TO APPLY Please send a cover letter, resume and completed TerraCorps Member Application to admin@terracorps.org