Serve with TerraCorps in Massachusetts!

Check out the map below to see open Member positions for the 2020-21 program year! For more details about each position, scroll past the map to read individual position announcements. Instructions on how to apply can be found at the bottom of the page. 

East Quabbin Land Trust

Hardwick, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education Coord.

Growing Places

Leominster, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Hilltown Land Trust

Ashfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardhsip Coord.

Kestrel Land Trust

Amherst, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement/ Youth Education Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust

Athol, MA
Hosting:
2 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Sudbury Valley Trustees

Sudbury, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardship/ Regional Collaboration Coord.

CitySprouts

Cambridge, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

The Wareham Land Trust + Mass Audubon Great Neck W.S.

Wareham, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement/ Land Stewardship Coord.

Emerald Necklace Conservancy

Boston, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

Just Roots

Greenfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Gardening the Community

Springfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Sustainable Agriculture Coord.

Natick Community Organic Farm

Natick, MA
Hosting:
1 Sustainable Agriculture Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

Southeastern MA Pine Barrens Alliance

Plymouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.

Grow Food Northampton

Florence, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Charles River Watershed Association

Weston, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust

Dartmouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship/ Community Engagement Coord.

Round The Bend Farm

South Dartmouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education/ Sustainable Ag Coord.

Speak For The Trees

Boston, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

The 300 Committee Land Trust

Falmouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

The Food Bank of Western MA

Hatfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement/ Sustainable Ag Coord.

Eagle Eye Institute

Holyoke, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education Coord.

Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture

Deerfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust

Athol, MA
Hosting:
2 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust

Athol, MA
Hosting:
2 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Kestrel Land Trust

Amherst, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement/ Youth Education Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Kestrel Land Trust

Amherst, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Community Engagement/ Youth Education Coord.
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Growing Places

Leominster, MA
Hosting:
1 Regional Collaboration Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Sudbury Valley Trustees

Sudbury, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardship/ Regional Collaboration Coord.

Sudbury Valley Trustees

Sudbury, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.
1 Land Stewardship/ Regional Collaboration Coord.

The Wareham Land Trust + Mass Audubon Great Neck W.S.

Wareham, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement/ Land Stewardship Coord.

Emerald Necklace Conservancy

Boston, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

Natick Community Organic Farm

Natick, MA
Hosting:
1 Sustainable Agriculture Coord.
1 Youth Education Coord.

Round The Bend Farm

South Dartmouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education/ Sustainable Ag Coord.

The Food Bank of Western MA

Hatfield, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement/ Sustainable Ag Coord.

Franklin Land Trust

Shelburne Falls, MA
Hosting:
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust

Dartmouth, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship/ Community Engagement Coord.

Merrimack River Watershed Council

Lawrence, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship/Community Engagement Coord.

Merrimack River Watershed Council

Lawrence, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship/Community Engagement Coord.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary- Mass Audubon

Natick, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Grow Food Northampton

Florence, MA
Hosting:
1 Youth Education Coord.
1 Community Engagement Coord.

Mass Audubon Conservation Science Dept.

Lincoln, MA
Hosting:
1 Land Stewardship Coord.

Scroll over the map to see what partner organizations are hosting TerraCorps members this year! Below the map are full position descriptions for each position. 

Open TerraCorps Service Positions

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary- Mass Audubon

Mass Audubon protects 38,000 acres of land throughout Massachusetts, saving birds and other wildlife, and making nature accessible to all. Mass Audubon Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary is one of nearly 60 Mass Audubon sanctuaries and protects over 800 acres of conservation land along the Charles River in the MetroWest area of Greater Boston.  Sustainable stewarding of our natural environment for resilience, connecting people and nature through education and advocacy, and collaborating with nearby cities, towns and other conservation organizations on land protection and management are key aspects of our mission.  Sustainable design of our nature center serves as an award winning model. The team at Broadmoor also works to protect and steward over 400 additional acres in the nearby towns of Holliston and Hopkinton.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands.  By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs generally spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary has proposed the following potential projects for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

  • Enhance and expand the Volunteer Steward Program by coordinating trainings, outings, and service days.
  • Play a significant role in implementing trail improvements, reroutes, and enhancements based on 57-page trail assessment. Identify projects with Property Manager and Trail Consultant, take leadership role in implementing specific projects by recruiting training and managing volunteers, including individuals, groups, and corporate volunteers.  Collaborate with Property Manager and Sanctuary Director on property management and community outreach projects including, trail and field maintenance, invasive plant management, boundary posting, building maintenance, small construction projects and other aspects of managing wildlife sanctuary properties.
  • Examine the desirability and feasibility of creating outdoor open space and trails usable by children in the Hoops and Homework out of school program. If the result of the study is favorable, collaborate with the housing project owners, town of Framingham and other stakeholders to create a community implementation plan.
  • Bird Monitoring: Assist Sanctuary Director and volunteers on a long term tree swallow and aerial Insect citizen science project and help plan for continuation of the project in the future. Assist Sanctuary Director in Breeding Bird Surveys and vegetation analysis at Waseeka Wildlife Sanctuary.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills, including ability to write detailed technical reports
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs Microsoft Office suite, Arc-GIS a plus.
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Land Stewardship Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience giving presentations and training/ educating diverse audiences
  • Able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions, navigate uneven terrain, and carry out various laborious tasks
  • Ability and willingness to serve some weekend days
  • Have basic knowledge of and willingness to learn the safe and proper use of hand tools, small power tools and work truck as related to the hands-on aspects of work in the field

For questions about Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary’s service positions, contact Elissa Landre at 508-655-2296 x7301 or elandre@massaudubon.org

CitySprouts

The CitySprouts mission is to develop, implement and maintain beautiful, resource-rich school gardens in collaboration with public school communities. Integrated into the academic curriculum, CitySprouts gardens inspire teachers, students, and families with a deep, hands-on connection to the food cycle, sustainable agriculture, and the natural environment.  Based in public elementary and middle schools, CitySprouts School Partnership Program works closely with teachers to establish experiential learning and integrate garden-based education into school culture. The CitySprouts Middle School Program curriculum is grounded in scientific inquiry, engineering practices and understanding food systems.  CitySprouts’  serve more than 7,000 students and 300 teachers in 21 public schools in Boston and Cambridge.

Charles River Watershed Association

Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) is an internationally recognized environmental nonprofit based in Weston, MA. CRWA’s mission is to protect, restore and enhance the Charles River and its watershed through science, advocacy and the law. CRWA develops science-based strategies to increase resilience, protect public health, and promote environmental equity as we confront a changing climate. CRWA’s programs serve the over 1 million residents of the watershed, and the millions of annual visitors to the Charles River.

Community Involved In Sustaining Agriculture (CISA)

Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture (CISA) is a non-profit organization that strengthens farms and engages the community to build the local food economy. Our programs include the Be a Local Hero, Buy Locally Grown® business membership and marketing campaign, educational activities for the public, technical assistance trainings and workshops for farmers. These programs, in addition to others, are focused on expanding market options for farmers and increasing access to local food for all communities in our region. CISA staff work collaboratively within the organization as well as outside the organization to educate partners and community members about the importance of local agriculture in our local food system.

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs.  By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. CISA has proposed the following potential projects for their Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

  1. CISA intends to help build sales at farmers’ markets, through the Healthy Incentive Program (HIP). It is our goal to bring non-traditional shoppers to the market to increase their access to local, fresh food and expand the market for market venders. CISA’s TerraCorps Member will collaborate with farmers’ market venders and managers, as well as partner organizations to create training materials that can be used to educate families about SNAP/HIP acceptance at markets.
  2. The TerraCorps Member will focus heavily on building strong relationships with partner organizations that have direct relationships with low-income residents. The goal of this project is to educate communities about the use of SNAP and HIP at farmers’ markets to ensure they know how they can receive the most out of the program. HIP makes markets more accessible to the broader community and currently we know that many families are not aware of how to use/access this benefit. A volunteer training program will be established with the assistance of the TerraCorps member to train volunteers that can then table at markets to answer questions related to SNAP/HIP and local agriculture. Volunteers will also be able to attend partner agency meetings to educate their staff on all the rules pertaining to HIP, where and how to use it. The member will be responsible for recruiting, promoting, and training new volunteers while collaborating with CISA and farmers’ market managers throughout the Pioneer Valley.
  3. Another priority for TerraCorps RCC will be to make markets more welcoming for new shoppers and non-English speakers. By expanding the potential customer base for area farmers’ markets the Member will help farms sell more to more people strengthening the markets’ viability. By creating informational tours at farmers’ markets, the Member will enable shoppers to learn ‘how’ to maneuver around the market, give an opportunity to ask questions and get comfortable with how markets operate, making it a more welcoming place.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs (i.e. Microsoft Office, Airtable, Constant Contact, WordPress, Survey Monkey)
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Regional Collaboration Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers
  • Spanish proficiency (applicants fluent in Spanish will receive priority consideration)
  • Comfortable engaging with people of various backgrounds including government agency staff, farmers, farmers’ market managers, business owners, and community members
  • Comfortable speaking on the telephone

For questions about CISA’s service positions, contact Devon Whitney-Deal, Devon@buylocalfood.org, 413-665-7100 x22.

Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust

The Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust (DNRT) was founded as an all-volunteer land trust in 1971 with a mission to preserve and protect Dartmouth’s natural resources for people and nature, forever. DNRT owns 58 fee properties totaling more than 1,700 acres in the town of Dartmouth. In addition to beautiful natural landscapes, our fee properties include active farmland, blueberry fields, a historic gristmill, and a unique daffodil field. DNRT manages 37 miles of trails where visitors can hike, bike, horseback ride, and walk their dogs. We offer programming for all ages that showcases the diversity of flora and fauna found on our nature reserves and emphasizes wellness for both the body and the mind. DNRT’s headquarters is located in a beautifully restored 1830s farmhouse located on 40 acres of active farmland. Our staff of five provides a friendly, relaxed, and professional work environment.

East Quabbin Land Trust

The East Quabbin Land Trust works to foster the sustainable use of our natural and historic resources for the benefit of all generations through the conservation and stewardship of the farmlands, woodlands and waters in our region of Massachusetts. We envision a regional community that continues to care for its natural environment and supports a sustainable local economy, ensuring a high quality of life for generations to come. The work of the East Quabbin Land Trust is focused in central Massachusetts, an area with a diverse landscape of rivers, villages, rolling farmland, forested highlands, wetlands and working communities.  The small staff and dedicated volunteers at the East Quabbin Land Trust are mission-driven, always striving to engage more people of all ages and abilities in the care and conservation of our lands.  We take risks, we try new things, and we have fun doing this work as we make lasting changes.

Emerald Necklace Conservancy

The Emerald Necklace Conservancy is a private non-profit stewardship organization founded in 1998 with the mission to restore and improve the Emerald Necklace for all. The Conservancy connects people with the Emerald Necklace parks and uses projects and programs to enrich the visitor experience and restore and renew the 1,100 acres of landscape, waterways and parkways extending from Boston’s Back Bay through Brookline and Jamaica Plain to Franklin Park in Dorchester. The Conservancy works in collaboration with its partners to restore, improve, maintain, and protect this iconic urban landscape through advocacy, maintenance and restoration, education and access, and volunteer and youth stewardship programs.

The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts

Since 1982, The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts has been feeding our neighbors in need and leading the community to end hunger. We provide food to our member agencies in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden and Hampshire counties. These 175 independent pantries, meal sites and shelters are on the front lines of emergency food assistance in our region, providing sustenance to individuals, families, seniors, children and people with disabilities (including veterans) to lead healthy and meaningful lives. On average, The Food Bank serves monthly 90,000 individuals experiencing food insecurity. More than 1/3 of the food distributed is fresh vegetables, and more than one million pounds derives from farms in the Pioneer Valley, including The Food Bank’s own 60-acre organic Food Bank Farm in Hadley.

Gardening the Community

Gardening the Community  (GTC) is a food justice organization engaged in youth development, urban agriculture, and sustainable living to build healthy and equitable communities. GTC plays an important role in Springfield’s food justice movement, working to create more access to healthy food, and building toward an equitable local food system. Youth development and urban agriculture are at the center of this work, with youth leadership development built into all levels of the organization. GTC works with youth to grow food on vacant lots and organizes to expand healthy, affordable food access in the Mason Square neighborhoods of Springfield.

Sustainable Agriculture Coordinators (SAC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. SACs may create raised beds or community gardens, monitor and maintain urban farmland, establish sustainable food systems, provide new farmer trainings, lead community workshops, etc. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for communities, demonstrate responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. SACs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Gardening the Community has proposed the following potential projects for their Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator:

  • Enhance and expand public involvement with GTC Farms and programs, by coordinating volunteer impact days, expanding our outreach, developing new community and corporate partnerships, organizing orientation and training systems for new volunteers including systems for volunteer communication and tracking and celebrating volunteer involvement. Partners would include area schools, businesses, and organizations. If the COVID pandemic continues, this project will focus on recruiting volunteers who are willing to practice social distance while farming and who could come to the site individually or in small groups.
  • Further developing our farm sites and Walnut St. Farm Store so that they are strong, community-based resources for families in Springfield. This will include assisting with farming activities and deepening our outreach in the neighborhoods around us and in Springfield in general so that more families are aware of GTC and use the Farm Store and CSA. We will focus on families who receive SNAP benefits.
  • Continuing to organize and develop a shared resource drive for farming at GTC. This will include creating an outline of the flow of farming tasks over the seasons, a description of key processes, and a list of resources and contacts used in the process so that the project is documented and more accessible to the full staff.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs (MS Word, Excel; ability to learn Survey Monkey and NeonCRM)
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Urban Agriculture Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers
  • Strong understanding of racial justice and food justice and experience with community-based work
  • experience with urban agriculture
  • Experience working with diverse groups of people and comfort working with young people of color from urban areas

For questions about GTC’s service positions, contact Ibrahim Ali (ibrahim@gardeningthecommunity.org) or 413-693-5340 x1

Grow Food Northampton

Grow Food Northampton strengthens the local food economy by giving everyone tools to participate in it. We provide access to land and other resources to farmers and community gardeners, bring farmers and customers together at our thriving downtown farmers’ market, and educate over a thousand children each year through a series of farm field trips and in-class cooking workshops. Our commitment to addressing inequity in the food system is woven throughout these programs and is the sole purpose of our Grow Food Shares programs, which offer low-income families many affordable access points to fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables. Our 121-acre farm and office are located in Florence, a village of Northampton, MA.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programming, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CECs demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of land, CECs build connections between the environment and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives. Through engaging diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CECs build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Grow Food Northampton (GFN) has proposed the following potential project(s) for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  • Build communications capacity for the organization by collaborating with GFN staff to design and roll out a communications and community engagement plan for all program areas
  • Improve long-term impact of GFN’s social media work by collaborating with staff to develop a social media strategic management plan that will engage and grow our online community, identify new social media platforms and possibilities for engagement of new audiences, and outline ideas for daily content
  • Create a media scan for GFN to stay attuned to relevant current events and trending content for ongoing strategic engagement opportunities; transform news and other content into compelling materials for our audience
  • Develop branding and content guide for the production of compelling copy that amplifies GFN’s messaging
  • Develop virtual events to reach new participants and engage our current audience; as pandemic conditions allow, there may be potential for development and implementation of in-person events, as well
  • Conduct research and help to develop guidelines for GFN to center racial justice and equity across all of our work and communication materials 

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs including MS Office and GSuite products
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Community Engagement Coordinator position and projects outlined above
  • Experience training and/or educating community members and volunteers
  • Extensive experience developing an active social media presence on platforms including, but not limited to, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook
  • A commitment to increasing racial equity and justice in the sustainable agriculture and food systems space
  • Experience developing public information materials, marketing materials, and/or press releases

For questions about Grow Food Northampton’s service positions, please contact Alisa Klein, Executive Director at: alisa@growfoodnorthampton.com

Growing Places

For over 17 years,  Growing Places(GP) has connected the community through ‘real’ food. GP was founded in 2001 as a private nonprofit organization to donate raised-bed vegetable gardens to low-income individuals in North Central Massachusetts in response to the high levels of poverty, hunger, food insecurity, health disparities and limited access to fresh, affordable and healthy food in the region. As we have strengthened our connection to and understanding of the community’s need, we have expanded beyond simply donating garden materials to creating long-term, sustainable changes that focus on increasing fresh food access and environmental sustainability for those with compromised social determinants of health.

Please stay tuned! Position will be posted shortly. 

Regional Collaboration Coordinators (RCC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by assessing community needs related to land conservation and land access and then organizing collaborative community projects to help meet these needs. They convene and coordinate municipal boards, all-volunteer local land trusts, planning agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, government agencies, neighborhood groups, community housing associations, and local businesses to build regional networks, and organize collaborative cross-sector working groups to initiate new projects around community needs.  By educating landowners, farmers, and community groups and organizing multi-stakeholder projects that increase access to funding, RCCs empower diverse people to create healthy, vibrant communities.

Growing Places maximizes impact by focusing on communities where residents experience the greatest health disparities related to food and nutrition in our region. This includes Fitchburg, Gardner, Leominster, Winchendon and Clinton– all communities that are considered food deserts with severely limited access to healthy whole foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. The population across these communities totals 120,000 residents. In 2019, GP served 1,811 individuals, a 48% increase from 2018. Our programs and services focus on connecting and filling gaps in key sectors of the food system as follows: coordinating seven community gardens (200+ raised beds), where residents and youth grow food for themselves and donate to food assistance programs (800+ pounds donated to 9 sites in 2019); growing indoors hydroponically to mitigate the effects of seasonality on local fruit and vegetable production; managing the Fitchburg and Leominster Farmers Markets and a new mobile farmers market that accept nutrition benefits (SNAP/HIP, WIC, Sr. Farmers Market Coupons); conducting elementary gardening and nutrition education during and after-school; promoting teen development through youth-led food justice projects in the community; and coordinating a regional effort to create an equitable hub and spoke healthy food system in our food desert areas in the Greater Winchendon and Gardner region HEAL Winchendon.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Growing Places has proposed the following potential projects for their Regional Collaboration Coordinator:

  • Collaborate with key stakeholders in our region’s most underserved communities to expand our HEAL Winchendon Healthy Food Access Project into additional communities.
  • Expand capacity of our new healthy food access services including Fresh Chef Meal Kits, mobile market and Local Food Marketplace program (includes engaging with local producers and consumers).
  • Coordinate the integration of our new hydroponic Tower Farm into healthy food access strategies (i.e., donations to food assistance programs and mobile market).
  • Engage residents in community driven CIRCL groups to ensure our local food system is just, inclusive and equitable.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs (list programs relevant to position/ your organization)
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Regional Collaboration Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers
  • Strong communicator, both verbal and written with diverse  stakeholders across all community sectors
  • Willingness to try new things, high level of resilience
  • Ability to conduct research, plan, implement and evaluate a strategy / program holistically

For questions about Growing Places’s service positions, contact Ayn Yeagle at ayn@growingplaces.org or 978-598-3723 ext. 801

Hilltown Land Trust + Franklin Land Trust

Hilltown Land Trust’s mission is to protect land and promote ecological diversity and health, respectful land stewardship, historic character and natural beauty in the Hilltowns of western Massachusetts. Hilltown Land Trust (HLT) serves thirteen rural towns in western Massachusetts, in which it holds 34 conservation restrictions and owns 9 properties protecting over 5,000 acres. HLT maintains active hiking trails at three properties with development of a fourth property  coming in the next year. In 2010, HLT and The Trustees of Reservations launched a partnership to combine the efforts and resources. HLT and The Trustees continue to function as independent entities, but now collaborate to increase the pace of land conservation in the Hilltowns. HLT’s offices are located at the Bullitt Reservation in Ashfield.

The Franklin Land Trust (FLT) works to conserve farms, forests, wildlands, and other natural resources significant to the quality of the environment, economy, and rural character of our region. We are an innovative, efficient, regional non-profit that has been working to conserve rural landscapes in Franklin County and surrounding towns since 1987. For 33 years, FLT has been steadfast in making land conservation our top priority, completing 415 projects in 32 towns across our region to conserve a total of 32,925 acres. FLT owns and maintains nine properties in Franklin County that are open to the public. FLT engages the greater community in our mission of land conservation through programs, workshops, publications and events. The FLT office is located in downtown Shelburne Falls.

Kestrel Land Trust + Eagle Eye Institute

Since 1970, Kestrel Land Trust has conserved and cared for forests, farms, and riverways in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, while nurturing an enduring love of the land. Kestrel has conserved more than 25,000 acres in the region, and we are responsible for stewarding 3,000 acres of protected lands. Throughout our history, we have partnered with landowners, governmental agencies, citizen groups, and other organizations to protect farmland, woodlands, wildlife habitat, water resources, historic landscapes, and scenic vistas throughout the Valley. Along the river, rich soils are actively farmed, while the surrounding hills harbor beautiful forestlands and quaint villages, and the Mount Holyoke Range rises above all. Kestrel leads regional efforts to maintain the natural qualities that make our Valley a place to love.

Eagle Eye Institute is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with a mission to empower urban people from underserved communities, especially youth of color, to be active caretakers of our environment. Eagle Eye was founded in 1991 by Anthony Sanchez and MaJa Kietzke with the vision of a world in which people of all cultural backgrounds are engaged in the stewardship of Earth’s resources everyday. Eagle Eye serves urban communities in Western Massachusetts, primarily Holyoke. We offer hands-on learning programs in nature that raise environmental awareness, develop responsibility, and cultivate leadership. We work collaboratively with schools, youth organizations, environmental agencies, universities, and natural resource professionals, leveraging partnerships to increase our impact. In addition to programs at our Berkshires site, we offer place-based programs in Holyoke and the Pioneer Valley.

Mass Audubon Conservation Science Department

Mass Audubon protects 38,000 acres of land throughout Massachusetts, saving birds and other wildlife, and making nature accessible to all.  As Massachusetts’ largest nature conservation nonprofit, we welcome more than a half million visitors a year to our wildlife sanctuaries and 20 nature centers. From inspiring hilltop views to breathtaking coastal landscapes, serene woods, and working farms, we believe in protecting our state’s natural treasures for wildlife and for all people—a vision shared in 1896 by our founders, two extraordinary Boston women. Our Conservation Science Department coordinates research, land management planning, and statewide bird conservation efforts. We design and implement habitat restoration projects, partner with academic researchers and citizen scientists to monitor declining species, and lead statewide and regional efforts to identify and protect the most imperiled birds and other wildlife.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC) Build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands.  By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. LSCs generally spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Mass Audubon’s Conservation Science Department have proposed the following potential projects for their Land Stewardship Coordinator:

1.Coordinate rare plant surveys and database at Mass Audubon: While Mass Audubon has kept records from staff and volunteers about rare plants on the wildlife sanctuaries in the past, the effort recently has not been coordinated. TerraCorps service members have started the process of coordinating this effort, but we still have the following needs:

    • Increase herbarium collection by continuing to survey wildlife sanctuaries that are known to have rare plants.
    • Research long-term database options for collecting this information and storing historical data

2. Increasing capacity to manage our land statewide:

    • Collaborate with the Regional Scientists to prioritize land management needs across our sites to determine those sites most in need of habitat management.
    • Funding permitting, collaborate with the Regional Scientists to develop and implement a seasonal summer crew of young professionals to learn how to manage land, build professional networks, and help us better steward our land.

3. Expanding deer density monitoring on conservation land in Massachusetts: White-tailed deer are overpopulated in many areas of Massachusetts. Areas with high densities of deer have suffered ecologically from high browse of the understory of the forests. Mass Audubon has been working with the state Fish and Wildlife Service to better understand the density of deer on our own sites so that we can try to manage the population in areas where it is most dense. This TerraCorps position will be tasked with the following:

    • Continue to support deer density monitoring efforts on our wildlife sanctuaries by recruiting and training volunteers in deer pellet counts.
    • Measure the effects of overabundant deer on our wildlife sanctuaries and the effectiveness of hunting on reducing the population at several sites.
    • Develop a program to train other conservation entities in the state to measure overabundance of deer and its impact on the land.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs (e.g., Microsoft Word, Excel, Teams)
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Land Stewardship Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers
  • Experience with natural systems and identifying plant and wildlife species
  • Knowledge and direct experience with ArcGIS mapping software
  • Ability to navigate independently in the field utilizing map, compass, and GPS units

For questions about Conservation Science service positions, contact Margo Servison, mservison@massaudubon.org.

Merrimack River Watershed Council

Merrimack River Watershed Council (MRWC) improves and conserves the Merrimack River watershed for people and wildlife through education, recreation, science, and advocacy. We work with diverse stakeholders and decision makers to address threats such as combined sewer overflows and climate change; educate the public; engage communities in protection; and promote public access to the Merrimack and its tributaries. MRWC was founded in 1978 to address the issue of pollution in the Merrimack River.  From the beginning, MRWC has seen our mission as a mandate to both to protect the community from the dangers of contamination in the water, and to engage and educate residents in protecting and preserving this vital natural resource.

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust

Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust (Mount Grace) is a regional land trust that is deeply rooted in collaboration. Since 1986, we have worked with dozens of partners and hundreds of landowners to protect more than 34,000 acres of woods, streams, farms, and trails in our picturesque rural region. Nestled between Gardner and Greenfield and anchored by the Quabbin Reservoir and its thousands of acres of pristine trails, we are working throughout 23 towns to foster a deep conservation ethic. We are nationally recognized for our innovative and collaborative projects, and Mount Grace was the home and founder of the TerraCorps program. Four of our eleven staff are AmeriCorps alumni, three of whom served with TerraCorps specifically. This year, we are hosting four TerraCorps members who will be fully integrated into our conservation, stewardship, and engagement teams. We are committed to developing the next generation of conservation leaders, and we are continually inspired by the creativity and vision of the TerraCorps members who choose to join us each year.

The Natick Community Organic Farm

Natick Community Organic Farm is a 501c3 nonprofit, certified-organic farm with ambitious agricultural and environmental mission of providing productive open space, farm products, and hands-on education for all ages, year-round. Located on 27 acres of conservation land since 1975, NCOF is an integral part of the Town of Natick’s geographic and agricultural landscape and a rich center of community life. Over 20,000 visitors come to the farm every year for educational programs, informal visits, and hands-on learning.  Thousands of students, volunteers, and community members spanning several generations have now been introduced to the importance of open productive space, organic agriculture, and supporting local farms and farmers.

Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by developing culturally inclusive systems, programming, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CECs demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By helping a broader cross-section of people experience the benefits of land, CECs build connections between the environment and people that increase public support for land access, revitalization, and conservation initiatives. Through engaging diverse peoples and collaborating with community partners, CECs build bridges that reinforce the connection between land and a sustainable social, economic, and environmental future for all people.

TerraCorps Members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Natick Community Organic Farm has proposed the following potential projects for their Community Engagement Coordinator:

  1. Develop and coordinate diverse adult programming.
    • Developing and teaching new adult-focused programs that occur during evening/weekend hours. These programs could cover a wide range of interests/topics depending on community interest.  Everything from beginner gardening to food preservation.  This can involve partnering with other non-profits or community services (libraries, colleges, etc.). 
    • Identify community stakeholders that would benefit from these adult programs.
  1. Design and develop a manual to help other groups create Community Gardens and Community Farms.
    • Look at the extensive history of NCOF and create a living document of best practices.
    • Look at what has worked and what hasn’t for Community based farming.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs Google Drive, Excel, GiveCloud & Donor Perfect
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Youth Education Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Exceptional work ethic, both independently and in groups. 
  • Flexible and self-directed worker, capable of managing own time and timeline, as well as tackling projects with limited supervision
  • Excited to experience all aspects of Farm life including, but not limited to; animal chores, field work, leading diverse groups of volunteers, etc.  
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers

For questions about Natick Community Organic Farm’s service position, contact Trish Wesley Umbrell (Trish@natickfarm.org)

Sustainable Agriculture Coordinators (SAC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. SACs may create raised beds or community gardens, monitor and maintain urban farmland, establish sustainable food systems, provide new farmer trainings, lead community workshops, etc. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, they increase resources for communities, demonstrate responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and nurture an inclusive sense of public ownership in the local landscape. SACs spend roughly 60% of their time in the office and 40% in the field.

TerraCorps Members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers.  Natick Community Organic Farm has proposed the following potential projects for their Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator:

  1. Develop a goat scaping program to clear invasive species: As part of the Town of Natick and given our location on conservation land, we’d like to partner with the Conservation Commission to use the Farm’s goat to clear invasives on other Conservation properties.
    • This will involve training our goats to electric fences as well as working with the Conservation Agent, the Director of Sustainability and other town officials to identify the appropriate property. This will also involve marketing this project on behalf of NCOF and recruiting and coordinating multiple volunteers to ensure a positive outcome for everyone (especially the goats). 
    • This project has a two-fold purpose as it is meant to reduce the strain on our pastures by giving our goats forage and it is meant to demonstrate a different way to think about green space/invasive control.
    • This project can also include collaborating with our local horticulture program at the Vocational High School and influencing the next generation of landscapers/horticulturists.
  2. Design and implement a multipurpose garden space in an underutilized space: Our ‘Toddler Garden’ is currently underutilized. Lacking the structure and purposeful planning of an educational garden, it is likewise not a crucial part of our yearly crop plan.
    • Meet with NCOF stakeholders (education and production) and develop a design that allows for numerous needs to be met. These could include a pollinator garden to be used during field trips, space to grow herbs to be used in educational opportunities, demonstrating different types of container/raised bed gardens for the general public, etc.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs Google Drive and Excel
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers
  • Exceptional work ethic, both independently and in groups.
  • Flexible and self-directed, capable of managing own time and timeline, as well as tackling projects with limited supervision.
  • Excited to experience all aspects of Farm life including, but not limited to; animal chores, field work, leading diverse groups of volunteers, etc.

For questions about Natick Community Organic Farm service positions, contact Casey Townsend (casey@natickfarm.org)

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. They collaborate with schools, libraries, and youth groups on projects that connect young people to the natural world, improve science literacy, and encourage healthy lifestyles. By serving with youth in an outdoor learning environment, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps Members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Natick Community Organic Farm has proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education Coordinator:

  1. We have historically offered programming during business hours, meaning that working families are infrequent participants. We think there is great room for growth both in our infrastructure to accommodate weekend and evening programs as well as coming up with new ideas for programming. This can include but is not limited to:
    • Offer weekend farm-based programing to appeal to youth and families who cannot take part in our traditional week-day program.
    • Offer weekend or evening classes beyond our traditional programming.
    • Develop new programs and new approaches to farm-based education.
  1. Expand our farm-based field trips into classroom presentations.
    • Given the current budget limitations for schools, we’d like to experiment with offering online programming and in-class programming.
    • This could potentially expand into an online curriculum for homeschoolers or distance learners.
    • This will include thinking about place-based education and how it can be done successfully within a classroom or even online.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs Google Drive, Excel, GiveCloud & Donor Perfect
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Youth Education Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Exceptional work ethic, both independently and in groups. 
  • Flexible and self-directed worker, capable of managing own time and timeline, as well as tackling projects with limited supervision
  • Excited to experience all aspects of Farm life including, but not limited to; animal chores, field work, leading diverse groups of volunteers, etc.  
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers

For questions about Natick Community Organic Farm’s service positions, contact Audrey Fergason (audrey@natickfarm.org)

Round the Bend Farm

Round the Bend Farm (RTB), a Center for Restorative Community, located in Dartmouth, Massachusetts is a working farm and educational non-profit. We are a living laboratory that cultivates, educates, and empowers people of all ages. We are devoted to the global paradigm shift toward hope and abundance by valuing diversity, modeling nature, and redefining wealth. Each choice that we make on the farm seeks to enhance and promote life. We aim to exemplify a lifestyle that respects and consciously works with the environment, using the resources offered by nature to their “highest good”. We are deeply aware that we are a part of nature’s complex web of interdependence. In each choice that we make as a team, we consider: What is the impact on nature? How can we use this resource to its full potential? And finally, how can we share these lessons with our community? Empowering others to make choices that are in line with their highest good is our ultimate goal as living laboratory.

A Service Member at Round the Bend Farm will be serving in a blended capacity, with 50% of time in a Youth Education role, and 50% of their time in a Sustainable Agriculture role.

Youth Education Coordinators (YEC)/ Sustainable Agriculture Coordinators (SAC) build the long-term capacity of their Service Site by engaging youth in service learning, experiential education, and inquiry-based science and nature learning projects. YEC/SACs may engage neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands. YEC/SACs may create raised beds or community gardens, monitor and maintain farmland, establish sustainable food systems, develop curriculum and programming, run youth trainings, lead community workshops, etc. By engaging youth in activities that support the hands-on stewardship of community lands, they reinforce the connection between people, nature, and community and foster an inclusive land stewardship ethic in future generations.

TerraCorps Members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Round the Bend Farm has proposed the following potential projects for their Youth Education/ Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator:

  • The YEC/SAC Member will support our education programs on the farm and in the wider community. This includes collaborating with teachers, students, and RTB staff to plan and implement experiential farm-based field trips, educational workshops, tours, presentations and other forms of community outreach.
  • The Member will also have the opportunity to support RTB’s food systems. This includes collaborating with our Garden Manager in the operation of RTB’s market-garden scale crop production. We are growing a diversified range of primarily vegetables, fruits, nuts, edible perennials and medicinal herbs, on roughly 2 acres of land, in order to feed and heal our community, source events and occasionally sell to the public. Cooking and on-site food processing and preservation is also a crucial part of our food systems.
  • We hope to increase our online presence and develop open source curriculum /materials to support people in these uncertain times. The YEC/SAC member could assist in developing these resources such as film projects, visual aids, outreach materials, and marketing support. As well as brainstorm new creative solutions that help address this need.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Google Docs. Skills in photography, film making, editing, and social media applications are not required but would be valuable
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Youth Education/Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers
  • Experience in organic growing and a general love of dirt
  • Strong work ethic and ability to complete tasks in a timely manner
  • Desire and ability to integrate into the community at the farm, open mindedness and high self-awareness are crucial

For questions about Round The Bend Farm’s service position, contact: Nate Sander;  Education Manager nate@roundthebendfarm.org

Southeastern Massachusetts Pine Barrens Alliance

Southeastern Massachusetts Pine Barrens Alliance (SEMPBA) is a 501c3 not for profit organization that is directed and managed solely by volunteers. SEMPBA formed in 2013 when a group of citizens realized that Plymouth, Massachusetts is in the heart of a globally rare and richly bio–diverse ecoregion named by the United States Geological Survey as the Atlantic Coastal Pine Barrens.  Our mission is to raise awareness and promote the restoration, management, conservation and protection of the world’s second largest remaining coastal pine barrens.

Speak For The Trees, Boston

The mission of Speak for the Trees is to improve the size and health of the urban tree canopy in Boston, especially in under-canopied and under-resourced neighborhoods. We partner with community members, parallel organizations, and municipalities to build a healthier tree canopy for all. Our community projects focus on education, plantings, and engagement at the neighborhood level. We believe that change happens when citizens have ownership over their urban spaces and feel empowered to take action. Trees, whether they be on private or public property, serve to connect residents to their community, their neighbors, and the larger global environment. We envision a city with a healthy tree canopy that takes into account issues of equity such as diversity, race, socioeconomic status, and geography.

Sudbury Valley Trustees

Sudbury Valley Trustees (SVT) is a regional land trust that works to protect natural areas, wildlife habitat, and farmland in the 36 communities that surround the Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord (SuAsCo) Rivers—an area situated between Boston and Worcester, Massachusetts. SVT is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that is supported by 2,900 member households and 200 volunteers. We accomplish our work through an all-volunteer Board of Directors, and 13 staff Members (full and part time). SVT is accredited by the national Land Trust Accreditation Commission. As of Fall 2019, SVT owns more than 2,400 acres on 91 reservations, and we hold conservation restrictions on another 88 properties totaling 2,830 acres. We also maintain more than 65 miles of hiking trails. Our headquarters is located in an old farmhouse on a lovely 53-acre property with views of field and forests.

The 300 Committee Land Trust

The 300 Committee Land Trust (T3C) is a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to permanently preserve and protect open space in Falmouth, MA through land acquisition, education and management. T3C safeguards natural resources, provides public green spaces, connects people with nature, and strives to retain Falmouth’s unique character and beauty. Since our beginnings in 1985, our land trust has helped protect more than 2,500 acres throughout Falmouth for conservation, recreation and clean drinking water.  Our lands contribute to a healthy environment and are preserved in perpetuity. In recent years, T3C has embraced the goal of making conservation lands accessible to all by providing trails and signage that can accommodate people of all abilities, where feasible. Additionally, T3C strives to provide more inclusive engagement opportunities to community members in outdoor programs they may otherwise not have access to.

Wareham Land Trust + Great Neck Wildlife Sanctuary- Mass Audubon

The Wareham Land Trust’s mission is to permanently protect and conserve special open spaces and natural resources to benefit water quality, wildlife habitat, the citizens of Wareham, and for the economic enhancement of the Town. The Wareham Land Trust is the premier conservation organization in the Town of Wareham. It is an all-volunteer land trust accredited by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission. The town covers 36 square miles with 54 miles of coastline which gives us very diverse landscape. From sandy beaches, to freshwater ponds and rivers, cranberry bogs to forests, Wareham has it all!  Our various boards and committees are made up of our dedicated members. We promote land protection, natural resource education, and smart growth. Through a variety of well-established methods we safeguard valuable land and water resources.

Mass Audubon protects 38,000 acres of land throughout Massachusetts, saving birds and other wildlife, and making nature accessible to all. Great Neck Wildlife Sanctuary in Wareham is managed by the Mass Audubon South Coast Sanctuaries and was recently expanded with the connection of the 112-acre former Sacred Hearts Retreat Center property. The 200-plus acre Great Neck property is part of the largest remaining contiguous forest stands along Buzzards Bay and home to several ecological zones including: barrier beach, salt marsh, freshwater pond, Red Maple swamp, and mature mixed transitional forest.

A Service Member at Mass Audubon Great Neck Wildlife Sanctuary and the Wareham Land Trust will be serving in a blended capacity, with 50% of time in a Land Stewardship role, and 50% of their time in a Community Engagement role.

Land Stewardship Coordinators (LSC)/ Community Engagement Coordinators (CEC) Build the long-term capacity of their Service Sites by creating networks of volunteers to support hands-on stewardship of community lands. They organize, train, and collaborate with municipal boards, neighborhood and civic associations, community members, youth groups, and schools to care for, improve access to, and support the long-term resiliency and sustainable use of community lands.  Members in this role also work on developing culturally inclusive systems, programming, partnerships, and events. By collaborating with community groups, CEC/LSCs demonstrate how the sustainable use and conservation of land can help address community needs related to education, public health, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, homelessness, poverty, hunger, and cultural decline. By providing training and organizing collaborative land-focused projects, Members increase resources for community projects, demonstrate environmentally responsible land management, help individuals build skills, and connect a broader cross-section of people to the land and the benefits it provides.

TerraCorps members engage with their supervisors to develop and carry out three or more capacity building projects over the course of the service year. Some of these projects will involve recruiting, training, and/or managing community volunteers. Mass Audubon Great Neck Wildlife Sanctuary and the Wareham Land Trust have proposed the following potential projects for their Land Stewardship/ Community Engagement Coordinator:

  • Engage Wareham community through innovative environmental programming and on-the-ground stewardship that builds new and long-lasting relationships with individuals and partner organizations.
  • Facilitate trail improvements, coordinate construction of projects, and/or develop interpretive materials that enhance visitor experience on Wareham properties.
  • Build a group of Citizen Science Volunteers in the realm of bird monitoring, state-listed turtles, deer browsing, invasive plants, climate change indicators or similarly related project.

Development of these and other projects will occur during the first two months of service and consider the member’s interests and skills.

Desired Qualifications

  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills
  • Able to serve both independently and as a member of a team
  • Comfort navigating computer software programs (Microsoft Word, Excel)
  • Training and experience pertinent to the Land Stewardship/ Community Engagement Coordinator position and projects listed above
  • Able to be active outside in a range of weather conditions, and navigate uneven terrain
  • Interest in ecology, wildlife, environmental science or natural communities
  • Experience developing public information materials including marketing and social media
  • Experience training and educating community members and volunteers

For questions about Mass Audubon and the Wareham Land Trust’s service position, contact Lauren Miller-Donnelly at laurenmiller@massaudubon.org, 508-636-2437. 

To Apply to Become a TerraCorps Member

email to tc

Send your completed application form along with a cover letter and resume to: admin@terracorps.org or mail to us using the address listed on the application

Please note– the TerraCorps application has been open since the end of April and will remain open until all positions are filled. We have received an unprecedented number of applications this year. While we do still have positions open and are so excited to see your application, in an effort to manage our staff time, we ask that you allow up to 5 business days for us to process your application. Thank you!